state Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “state” in the English Dictionary

"state" in British English

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statenoun

uk   us   /steɪt/

state noun (CONDITION)

B2 [C] a ​condition or way of being that ​exists at a ​particulartime: The ​building was in a state ofdisrepair. She was ​foundwandering in a ​confused state (of ​mind). Give me the ​keys - you're not in a state to ​drive. After the ​accident I was in a state of ​shock. I came ​home to an ​unhappy state of ​affairs (= ​situation). The ​kitchen was in ​itsoriginal state, with a 1920s ​sink and ​stove.the state of play UK the ​presentsituation: The ​articleprovides a ​usefulsummary of the ​current state of ​play in the ​negotiations.
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state noun (COUNTRY)

C1 [C or U] a ​country or ​itsgovernment: The ​drought is ​worst in the ​centralAfrican states. Britain is one of the member states of the ​European Union. The ​government was ​determined to ​reduce the ​number of state-owned ​industries. Some ​theatresreceive a ​smallamount of ​funding from the state.formal His ​diaryincludedcomments on affairs/​matters of state (= ​information about ​governmentactivities).B1 [C] a ​part of a ​largecountry with ​its own ​government, such as in Germany, ​Australia, or the US: Alaska is the ​largest state in the US Representatives are ​elected from each state.the States informal used to refer to the USin state If a ​king, ​queen, or ​governmentleader does something in state, they do it in a ​formal way as ​part of an ​officialceremony: The Queen ​rode in state to the ​opening of Parliament.
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stateverb [T]

uk   us   /steɪt/ formal
B2 to say or write something, ​especiallyclearly and ​carefully: Our ​warrantyclearly states the ​limits of ​ourliability. [+ (that)] Union ​members stated (that) they were ​unhappy with the ​proposal. [+ question word] Please state why you ​wish to ​apply for this ​grant. Children in the stated (= ​named)areas were at ​risk from a ​lack of ​food, the ​report said.
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stateadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /steɪt/
B2 provided, ​created, or done by the state (= ​government of a ​country): state ​education/​industries state ​legislature/​law state ​control state ​funding/​pensions/​subsidies State ​events are ​formalofficialceremonies that ​involve a ​leader of a ​country or someone who ​represents the ​government: the state ​opening of Parliament a state ​funeral
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(Definition of state from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"state" in American English

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statenoun [C]

 us   /steɪt/

state noun [C] (WAY OF BEING)

a ​condition or way of being: The ​stable was ​preserved in ​itsoriginal state. Yourroom is in a ​terrible state. It's a ​sad state of ​affairs (= a ​badsituation) when ​ourrivers are so ​endangered.

state noun [C] (PLACE)

politics & government one of the ​politicalunits that some ​countries, such as the US, are ​divided into: New York State the State of Arizona politics & government A state is also a ​country or ​itsgovernment: the ​member states of the ​UnitedNationsthe States US history The States is another way of referring to the ​United States: When will you be ​visiting the States?

stateverb [T]

 us   /steɪt/

state verb [T] (EXPRESS)

to ​expressinformationclearly and ​carefully: His will states the ​property is to be ​sold. Please state ​yourpreference.

stateadjective [not gradable]

 us   /steɪt/

state adjective [not gradable] (PLACE)

provided, ​created, or done by the state: a state ​legislature/​law state ​police politics & government State also refers to ​formal or ​officialgovernmentactivities: a state ​dinner
(Definition of state from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"state" in Business English

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statenoun

uk   us   /steɪt/
[C, usually singular] the ​condition that someone or something is in at a particular ​time: The ​offices were in a state of disrepair. The ​index for ​capitalgoodsproduction is a ​keyindicator of the state of the ​economy. They commented on the poor state of the company's ​finances. Some ​economists are ​predicting that ​publicfinances will ​return to a healthy state within five ​years. They are ​paid a ​stable, ​fairprice, regardless of the current state of the ​market.
state of affairs a ​situation: Poor decisions by the ​boardbear most of the ​responsibility for this sorry state of affairs.
the state of play UK the ​presentsituation: The ​meetingreviewed the state of ​play in each ​market.
[C] (also State) GOVERNMENT a country with its own ​government: the West African State of Ghana The ​legislationrequires the ​agreement of every one of the EU's member states. In December 1991, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics was ​broken up into fifteen independent states.
[C] (also State) GOVERNMENT a ​part of a large country such as Australia, Germany, or the US that has its own ​government: The German ​federal states have a large degree of autonomy. the northern/southern/eastern/western states of the US The ​companyoperates hospitals in 12 states, ​including Texas and California. The Navajo ​reservationstretches from Arizona into two neighbouring states.
[U or S] (also the state, also the State) GOVERNMENT the ​government of a country: funded/​provided/​run by the state affairs/matters of state The ​government was ​determined to ​reduce the ​number of state-ownedindustries. They hope to ​reduce dependence on the state by ​payingbenefits only to those whose ​incomefalls below a new, ​highertaxthreshold.
the States [plural] informal used to refer to the United States of America: If they wish to ​work in the States again, they must show ​proof of ​employment with a US-based ​employer.

stateverb [T]

uk   us   /steɪt/
to say or write something, especially when it is done clearly and carefully: Our ​warranty clearly states the ​limits of our ​liability.state that The ​rules state that the ​directors are ​required by ​law to prepare ​financialstatements for each ​financialperiod. Make your ​claim in writing, stating your ​fullname and ​address.state a fact/opinion I wasn't criticizing the way you ​run the ​department; I was merely stating facts.
[usually passive] to give or ​agree the details of something: a stated commitment/goal The ​central bank's stated ​goal is to ​keep the ​inflationrate between 1 and 3%. Time ​deposits are ​non-negotiabledepositsmaintained in a ​bankinginstitution for a ​specifiedperiod of ​time at a stated ​interestrate. A ​fund with a 50% ​turnover has ​bought and ​sold half of the ​value of its ​totalinvestmentportfolio during the stated ​period.

stateadjective [before noun]

(also State) uk   us   /steɪt/ GOVERNMENT
provided, ​owned, or done by the ​government of a country: state companies/enterprises/monopolies The ​mainports are ​owned by state ​economicenterprises. state ​education/a state school state ​subsidies
relating to a particular state of a country, especially the US: state ​agencies/​employees/​legislature
(Definition of state from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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