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Meaning of “steady” in the English Dictionary

"steady" in British English

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steadyadjective

uk   /ˈsted.i/ us   /ˈsted.i/
  • steady adjective (GRADUAL)

B2 happening in a smooth, gradual, and regular way, not suddenly or unexpectedly: The procession moved through the streets at a steady pace. Orders for new ships are rising, after several years of steady decline. Over the last ten years he has produced a steady flow/stream/trickle of articles and papers. Progress has been slow but steady.

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  • steady adjective (FIRM)

B2 not moving or changing suddenly: I'll hold the boat steady while you climb in. Most rental prices have held steady this year. Young people assume that if you are in a steady relationship, you don't have to worry about HIV.
steady job/work
C2 work that is likely to continue for a long time and for which you will be paid regularly: Owning your own home and having a steady job will help when applying for a loan.
  • steady adjective (CONTROLLED)

B2 under control: a steady voice/look/gaze You need steady nerves to drive in city traffic. Painting these small details needs a steady hand.
used to describe someone who can be trusted to show good judgment and act in a reasonable way: a steady friend
steadiness
noun [U] uk   /ˈsted.i.nəs/ us   /ˈsted.i.nəs/

steadyverb [T]

uk   /ˈsted.i/ us   /ˈsted.i/

steadyadverb

uk   /ˈsted.i/ us   /ˈsted.i/ old-fashioned
(Definition of steady from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"steady" in American English

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steadyadjective

us   /ˈsted·i/
  • steady adjective (GRADUAL)

happening or developing in a gradual, regular way over a period of time: steady improvement steady growth in profits His recovery has been slow but steady.
  • steady adjective (NOT MOVING)

not moving or changing suddenly; continuing in the same condition: a steady job/relationship I’ll hold the boat steady while you climb in. We drove at a steady 65 mph for most of the trip.
  • steady adjective (CONTROLLED)

calm and under control: Her voice was steady as she described the accident.

steadyverb

us   /ˈsted·i/
  • steady verb (STOP MOVING)

[I/T] to stop shaking or moving, or to make something do this: [T] He wobbled a little on the bike and then steadied himself. [I] The stock market has steadied after a sharp fall in prices.
  • steady verb (CONTROL)

[T] to make someone calm: He took a deep breath to steady his nerves.
(Definition of steady from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"steady" in Business English

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steadyadjective

uk   /ˈstedi/ us  
continuing to happen or change at a gradual and regular rate: steady rise/growth/increase Retail sales showed steady growth through 2010. Orders for new ships are rising, after several years of steady decline. The plant has made steady progress in lowering production costs. steady flow/stream/trickle Over the last 10 years he has produced a steady flow of successful new designs.
fixed and not moving or changing suddenly: hold/remain steady Most rental prices have held steady this year.steady against sth The dollar was steady against the yen.steady income/supply/revenue The annuity yields a steady income.
a steady job is likely to last for a long time and not be lost suddenly: Her disability makes it difficult for her to keep a steady job. If he finds steady work, his family will move to the area with him.
steadiness
noun [U]
(Definition of steady from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“steady” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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