steady Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “steady” in the English Dictionary

"steady" in British English

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steadyadjective

uk   /ˈsted.i/  us   /ˈsted.i/
  • steady adjective (GRADUAL)

B2 happening in a ​smooth, ​gradual, and ​regular way, not ​suddenly or ​unexpectedly: The ​processionmoved through the ​streets at a steady ​pace. Orders for new ​ships are ​rising, after several ​years of steady ​decline. Over the last ten ​years he has ​produced a steady flow/​stream/​trickle of ​articles and ​papers. Progress has been slow but steady.

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  • steady adjective (FIRM)

B2 not ​moving or ​changingsuddenly: I'll hold the ​boat steady while you ​climb in. Most ​rentalprices have held steady this ​year. Young ​peopleassume that if you are in a steady relationship, you don't have to ​worry about ​HIV.
steady job/work
C2 work that is ​likely to ​continue for a ​longtime and for which you will be ​paidregularly: Owning ​your own ​home and having a steady ​job will ​help when ​applying for a ​loan.
  • steady adjective (CONTROLLED)

B2 under ​control: a steady ​voice/​look/​gaze You need steady nerves to ​drive in ​citytraffic. Painting these ​smalldetailsneeds a steady hand.
used to ​describe someone who can be ​trusted to show good ​judgment and ​act in a ​reasonable way: a steady ​friend
steadiness
noun [U] uk   /ˈsted.i.nəs/  us   /ˈsted.i.nəs/

steadyverb [T]

uk   /ˈsted.i/  us   /ˈsted.i/

steadyadverb

uk   /ˈsted.i/  us   /ˈsted.i/ old-fashioned
(Definition of steady from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"steady" in American English

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steadyadjective

 us   /ˈsted·i/
  • steady adjective (GRADUAL)

happening or ​developing in a ​gradual, ​regular way over a ​period of ​time: steady ​improvement steady ​growth in ​profits His ​recovery has been ​slow but steady.
  • steady adjective (NOT MOVING)

not ​moving or ​changingsuddenly; ​continuing in the same ​condition: a steady ​job/​relationship I’ll ​hold the ​boat steady while you ​climb in. We ​drove at a steady 65 ​mph for most of the ​trip.
  • steady adjective (CONTROLLED)

calm and under ​control: Her ​voice was steady as she ​described the ​accident.

steadyverb

 us   /ˈsted·i/
  • steady verb (STOP MOVING)

[I/T] to ​stopshaking or ​moving, or to make something do this: [T] He ​wobbled a little on the ​bike and then steadied himself. [I] The ​stockmarket has steadied after a ​sharpfall in ​prices.
  • steady verb (CONTROL)

[T] to make someone ​calm: He took a ​deepbreath to steady his ​nerves.
(Definition of steady from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"steady" in Business English

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steadyadjective

uk   us   /ˈstedi/
continuing to ​happen or ​change at a gradual and ​regularrate: steady rise/growth/increase Retail ​sales showed steady ​growth through 2010. Orders for new ​ships are ​rising, after several ​years of steady ​decline. The ​plant has made steady ​progress in ​loweringproductioncosts. steady flow/stream/trickle Over the last 10 ​years he has ​produced a steady ​flow of ​successful new ​designs.
fixed and not ​moving or ​changing suddenly: hold/remain steady Most ​rentalprices have ​held steady this ​year.steady against sth The ​dollar was steady against the ​yen.steady income/supply/revenue The ​annuityyields a steady ​income.
a steady ​job is likely to last for a ​longtime and not be ​lost suddenly: Her ​disability makes it difficult for her to ​keep a steady ​job. If he ​finds steady ​work, his family will ​move to the ​area with him.
steadiness
noun [U]
(Definition of steady from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“steady” in Business English

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