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Meaning of “steer” in the English Dictionary

"steer" in British English

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steerverb

uk   /stɪər/  us   /stɪr/
B2 [I or T] to ​control the ​direction of a ​vehicle: She ​carefully steered the ​car around the ​potholes. This ​car is very ​easy to steer.
[I or T] If a ​vehicle steers, it ​follows a ​particularroute or ​direction: The ​shippassed Land's End, in Cornwall, then steered towards ​southern Ireland.
[T usually + adv/prep] to take someone or something or make someone or something go in the ​direction in which you ​want him, her, or it: She steered her ​guests into the ​diningroom. I'd like to steer ​ourdiscussion back toouroriginaltopic. The ​maintask of the new ​government will be to steer the ​countrytowardsdemocracy.

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steernoun [C]

uk   /stɪər/  us   /stɪr/
  • steer noun [C] (COW)

a ​youngmale of the cattlefamily that has had ​itssexorgansremoved, usually ​kept for ​meat
  • steer noun [C] (ADVICE)

give (sb) a steer
UK to ​advise someone or give them ​usefulinformation about something: Here are my ​questions. Can anyone give me a steer?
give (sb) a bum steer
US to give someone ​badadvice: The ​guy at the ​informationoffice gave me a ​bum steer - the ​restaurant was ​terrible.
(Definition of steer from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"steer" in American English

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steerverb [I/T]

 us   /stɪər/
  • steer verb [I/T] (DIRECT)

to ​control the ​direction of a ​vehicle: [T] It’s not ​easy to steer the ​car through these ​narrowstreets. [I] fig. The ​speech steered ​clear of (= ​avoided)controversialissues.
If you steer someone, you ​cause the ​person to go in a ​particulardirection: [T] She steered her ​guests into the ​diningroom.
If you steer an ​activity, you ​cause it to ​deal with a ​particularfeature or ​topic: [T] I’d like to steer the ​discussion back to ​ouroriginaltopic.

steernoun [C]

 us   /stɪr/
  • steer noun [C] (MALE COW)

a ​youngmale of the ​cattlefamily that has had ​itssexorgansremoved and that is usually ​raised for ​meat
(Definition of steer from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"steer" in Business English

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steerverb [T]

uk   us   /stɪər/
to make something or someone go in a particular direction or ​progress in a particular way: steer sth back to sth I'd like to steer our discussion back to our ​original topic. steer sth through sth The new ​CEO will have to steer the ​company through choppy waters.
MANAGEMENT to be in ​charge of a ​company, ​organization, etc.: We have done a lot of ​long-termthinking about how we will steer the ​company.
steer a course/path
to take a ​series of ​actions carefully in ​order to ​achieve a particular thing: The ​government will steer a ​course of ​stability for the ​economy.
steer clear
to ​avoid someone or something that seems unpleasant, ​risky, or dangerous: steer clear (of sth/sb) He ​tries to steer ​clear of an ​overdraft on his ​currentaccount. She has ​managed to steer ​clear of any suggestion of a ​conflict of ​interest. The ​risks are high, and careful ​investors should steer ​clear.

steernoun [S]

uk   us   /stɪər/
a ​piece of ​information or ​advice: I need a steer on what to do next.give sb a steer (on/with sth) Can someone please give me a steer on how to ​install the ​software?
(Definition of steer from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“steer” in British English

“steer” in American English

“steer” in Business English

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