stem Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “stem” in the English Dictionary

"stem" in British English

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stemnoun [C]

uk   /stem/ us   /stem/
  • stem noun [C] (CENTRAL PART)

a central part of something from which other parts can develop or grow, or which forms a support
the stick-like central part of a plant that grows above the ground and from which leaves and flowers grow, or a smaller thin part that grows from the central part and supports the leaves and flowers: flower stems
the thin vertical part of a glass or similar container that joins the part that holds liquid to the flat bottom part on which it stands: Champagne glasses usually have long stems.
  • stem noun [C] (WORD)

the part of a word that is left after you take off the ending: From the stem "sav-" you get "saves", "saved", "saving", and "saver".
  • stem noun [C] (WATCH)

US UK winder the small part on the side of a watch that you turn to move the hands (= parts that point to the numbers), or to make the watch operate
  • stem noun [C] (SHIP)

the main supporting structure at the front of a ship

stemverb [T]

uk   /stem/ us   /stem/ -mm-
(Definition of stem from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stem" in American English

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stemnoun [C]

us   /stem/
  • stem noun [C] (CENTRAL PART)

a central part of something from which other parts can develop or grow, or which forms a support
The stem of a plant is the straight part that grows above the ground and from which leaves and flowers grow.
The stem of a glass is the narrow, vertical part that supports the container into which you put liquid.

stemverb [T]

us   /stem/ -mm-
  • stem verb [T] (STOP)

to stop something unwanted from spreading or increasing: The bank tried to stem the currency’s recent decline against the dollar.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of stem from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“stem” in American English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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