stick Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “stick” in the English Dictionary

"stick" in British English

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sticknoun

uk   us   /stɪk/

stick noun (THIN PIECE)

B1 [C] a ​thinpiece of ​wood or other ​material: The ​old man was ​carrying a ​load of sticks. Police said that the ​child had been ​beaten with a stick. Find some ​dry sticks and we'll make a ​campfire. A ​lollipop is a ​sweet on a stick.B1 [C] mainly UK (US usually cane) a ​long, ​thinwoodenpole that ​especiallyold or ​injuredpeople use to ​help them ​walk: a walking stick At 84 he's still ​quiteactive, ​although he ​walks with the ​aid of a stick.B1 [C] a ​long, ​thinpiece of ​wood used in ​playingvarioussports: a ​hockey/​lacrosse/​polo stick [C] a ​long, ​thinpiece of something: carrot/​bread sticks a stick of celery/​rhubarb/​chewinggum/​chalk/​dynamite [C] US a ​car with a stick ​shift: Do you ​drive a stick?stick of furniture informal a ​piece of ​furniture: When they got ​married, they didn't have a stick of ​furniture.take a stick to sb/sth to ​hit someone or something with a ​long, ​thinpiece of ​wood: He said that when he was a ​boy, his ​father used to take a stick to him to ​punish him.
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stick noun (CRITICISM)

[U] UK informal severecriticism: I really got/took stick from my ​boss about being late for ​work again. We gave him some stick for ​wearing that ​sillyhat.

stick noun (COUNTRYSIDE)

the sticks [plural] informal disapproving an ​area in the ​countryside that is ​far from a ​town or ​city: I'm ​sick of ​living in the sticks. They ​live out in the sticks ​somewhere.

stickverb

uk   us   /stɪk/ (stuck, stuck)

stick verb (FIX)

B1 [I or T] to ​cause something to ​becomefixed, for ​example with ​glue or another ​similarsubstance: I ​tried to stick the ​pieces together with some ​glue/​tape. He stuck up an ​announcement on the ​board withpins. This ​glue won't stick. My car's stuck in the ​mud. Stir the ​sauce so that it doesn't stick to the ​pan. My ​book got ​wet and all the ​pages have stuck together. [I] If a ​name sticks, it ​continues to be used: Although her ​name is Clare, her little ​sister called her Lali, and ​somehow the ​name stuck.
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stick verb (PUT)

informal to put something ​somewhere, ​especially in a not very ​careful way: "Where shall I put these ​books?" "Oh, just stick them on the ​table for now." She stuck her ​fingers in her ​ears so that she couldn't ​hear the ​noise. I'll ​pay for ​lunch - I can stick it on my ​expenses. [T usually + adv/prep] offensive If you ​tell someone to stick something or where they can stick something, it ​means that you do not ​want to ​keep that thing: "I've had enough of ​working here," she said, "You can stick ​yourjob!"
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  • I'll just stick my ​bag down.
  • Just stick ​yourbag under the ​table.
  • I stuck my ​jacket over the back of my ​chair.
  • I didn't ​know what to do with these so I stuck them ​outside for now.
  • I stuck them in the ​fridge and ​left them there.

stick verb (PUSH INTO)

B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​push a ​pointedobject into or through something, or (of a ​pointedobject) to be ​pushed into or through something and ​stay there: She stuck the ​needle into my ​arm. We ​decided where to go for ​ourholiday by ​closingoureyes and sticking a ​pin in the ​map. A ​thorn stuck in her ​finger. The ​metalsprings were sticking through the ​mattress.

stick verb (NOT CONTINUE)

[I] In some ​cardgames, if you stick, you say that you do not ​want to be given any more ​cards.

stick verb (ACCEPT)

[T] UK informal to ​bear or ​accept something or someone ​unpleasant: I don't ​think I can stick this ​job a ​daylonger. [+ -ing verb] I don't ​know how you can stick living in this ​place.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stick" in American English

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sticknoun [C]

 us   /stɪk/

stick noun [C] (THIN PIECE)

a ​thinpiece of ​wood: The ​camperscollected sticks to ​start a ​fire. A stick is also a ​long, ​thinhandle with a ​speciallyshaped end, used esp. to ​play hockey and lacrosse . A stick can also be a ​long, ​thinpiece of something: sticks of ​dynamite a stick of ​chewinggum

stickverb

 us   /stɪk/ (past tense and past participle stuck  /stʌk/ )

stick verb (PUSH INTO)

[always + adv/prep] to ​push something ​pointed into or through something, or to be ​pushed into or through something: [T] I ​simply cannot ​watch when someone sticks a ​needle in my ​arm. [I] He ​throws the ​knife, and the ​blade sticks in the ​wall.

stick verb (ATTACH)

[I/T] to ​attach or ​becomeattached: [T] Stick the ​tape to the back of the ​picture. [I] It was so ​hot that my ​clothes stuck to me.

stick verb (PUT)

[T always + adv/prep] infml to put something ​somewhere, usually ​temporarily: Stick the ​packages under the ​table for now.stick out your tongue If you stick out ​yourtongue, you ​pushyourtongue out of ​yourmouth, usually as an ​insult: She stuck her ​tongue out at him and smiled.Note: This action is usually done by children.

stick verb (BE UNABLE TO MOVE)

[I] to be ​fixed in ​position and ​unable to move: The ​window sticks, making it hard to ​shut it.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"stick" in Business English

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stickverb [I or T]

uk   us   /stɪk/ (stuck, stuck)
to fasten something somewhere, for ​example with glue: stick sth on/onto sth Stick these ​labels on the ​top of the ​boxes.stick sth up (with sth) He stuck up a ​notice on the ​board with pins.
to ​stay at the same ​level or ​position for a ​longtime: stick/be stuck at sth The bank's ​mainmoneymarketrate has been stuck at 4.50% for eight weeks. The needle on the ​oilgaugekeeps sticking.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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