stick Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “stick” in the English Dictionary

"stick" in British English

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sticknoun

uk   /stɪk/ us   /stɪk/
  • stick noun (THIN PIECE)

B1 [C] a thin piece of wood or other material: The old man was carrying a load of sticks. Police said that the child had been beaten with a stick. Find some dry sticks and we'll make a campfire. A lollipop is a sweet on a stick.
B1 [C] mainly UK US usually cane a long, thin wooden pole that especially old or injured people use to help them walk: a walking stick At 84 he's still quite active, although he walks with the aid of a stick.
[C] a long, thin piece of something: carrot/bread sticks a stick of celery/rhubarb/chewing gum/chalk/dynamite
[C] US a car with a stick shift: Do you drive a stick?
stick of furniture
informal a piece of furniture: When they got married, they didn't have a stick of furniture.
take a stick to sb/sth
to hit someone or something with a long, thin piece of wood: He said that when he was a boy, his father used to take a stick to him to punish him.

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  • stick noun (CRITICISM)

[U] UK informal severe criticism: I really got/took stick from my boss about being late for work again. We gave him some stick for wearing that silly hat.
  • stick noun (COUNTRYSIDE)

the sticks [plural] informal disapproving
an area in the countryside that is far from a town or city: I'm sick of living in the sticks. They live out in the sticks somewhere.

stickverb

uk   /stɪk/ us   /stɪk/ stuck, stuck
  • stick verb (FIX)

B1 [I or T] to cause something to become fixed, for example with glue or another similar substance: I tried to stick the pieces together with some glue/tape. He stuck up an announcement on the board with pins. This glue won't stick. My car's stuck in the mud. Stir the sauce so that it doesn't stick to the pan. My book got wet and all the pages have stuck together.
[I] If a name sticks, it continues to be used: Although her name is Clare, her little sister called her Lali, and somehow the name stuck.

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  • stick verb (PUT)

informal to put something somewhere, especially in a not very careful way: "Where shall I put these books?" "Oh, just stick them on the table for now." She stuck her fingers in her ears so that she couldn't hear the noise. I'll pay for lunch - I can stick it on my expenses.
[T usually + adv/prep] offensive If you tell someone to stick something or where they can stick something, it means that you do not want to keep that thing: "I've had enough of working here," she said, "You can stick your job!"

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  • stick verb (PUSH INTO)

B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to push a pointed object into or through something, or (of a pointed object) to be pushed into or through something and stay there: She stuck the needle into my arm. We decided where to go for our holiday by closing our eyes and sticking a pin in the map. A thorn stuck in her finger. The metal springs were sticking through the mattress.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stick" in American English

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sticknoun [C]

us   /stɪk/
  • stick noun [C] (THIN PIECE)

a thin piece of wood: The campers collected sticks to start a fire.
A stick is also a long, thin handle with a specially shaped end, used esp. to play hockey and lacrosse.
A stick can also be a long, thin piece of something: sticks of dynamite a stick of chewing gum

stickverb

us   /stɪk/ past tense and past participle stuck /stʌk/
  • stick verb (PUSH INTO)

[always + adv/prep] to push something pointed into or through something, or to be pushed into or through something: [T] I simply cannot watch when someone sticks a needle in my arm. [I] He throws the knife, and the blade sticks in the wall.
  • stick verb (ATTACH)

[I/T] to attach or become attached: [T] Stick the tape to the back of the picture. [I] It was so hot that my clothes stuck to me.
  • stick verb (PUT)

[T always + adv/prep] infml to put something somewhere, usually temporarily: Stick the packages under the table for now.
stick out your tongue
If you stick out your tongue, you push your tongue out of your mouth, usually as an insult: She stuck her tongue out at him and smiled.
Note: This action is usually done by children.
  • stick verb (BE UNABLE TO MOVE)

[I] to be fixed in position and unable to move: The window sticks, making it hard to shut it.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"stick" in Business English

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stickverb [I or T]

uk   /stɪk/ us   stuck, stuck
to fasten something somewhere, for example with glue: stick sth on/onto sth Stick these labels on the top of the boxes.stick sth up (with sth) He stuck up a notice on the board with pins.
to stay at the same level or position for a long time: stick/be stuck at sth The bank's main money market rate has been stuck at 4.50% for eight weeks. The needle on the oil gauge keeps sticking.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“stick” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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