stoke Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “stoke” in the English Dictionary

"stoke" in British English

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stokeverb [I or T]

uk   /stəʊk/  us   /stoʊk/ (also stoke up)
to ​addfuel to a ​largefire and ​move the ​fuel around with a ​stick so that it ​burns well and ​produces a lot of ​heat: Once the ​fire had been stoked up, the ​roombegan to get ​warm. to ​encouragebadideas or ​feelings in a lot of ​people: He's been ​accused of stoking up ​racialhatred in the ​region. Rumours of an ​emergencymeeting of the ​financecommittee stoked the ​atmosphere of ​crisis.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of stoke from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stoke" in American English

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stokeverb [T]

 us   /stoʊk/
to ​addfuel to a ​largeenclosedfire and move the ​fuel around so that it ​burns well and ​produces a lot of ​heat: Returning to the ​camp, he stoked the ​fire. fig. The ​flag is a ​symbol used to stoke the ​flames of (= ​increase)nationalpride.
(Definition of stoke from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"stoke" in Business English

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stokeverb [T]

uk   us   /stəʊk/
to encourage ​negativeideas or ​feelings about a particular ​situation: Worries about the company's future ​revenuegrowth were stoked by a ​drop in ​personalcomputersales.
(Definition of stoke from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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