Meaning of “storm” in the English Dictionary

"storm" in British English

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stormnoun

uk /stɔːm/ us /stɔːrm/

storm noun (VIOLENT WEATHER)

A2 [ C ] an extreme weather condition with very strong wind, heavy rain, and often thunder and lightning:

A lot of trees were blown down in the recent storms.
They're still cleaning up the storm damage.

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stormverb

uk /stɔːm/ us /stɔːrm/

storm verb (ATTACK)

[ T ] to attack a place or building by entering suddenly in great numbers:

The fortress was stormed by hundreds of soldiers.

storm verb (EMOTIONAL REACTION)

[ I or T ] literary to express anger in a loud and often uncontrolled way:

[ + speech ] "Get out and never come back!" he stormed.
storm in/into/out

to enter or leave a place in a way that shows that you are angry:

He stormed out of the house, slamming the door as he went.

-stormsuffix

uk / -stɔːm/ us / -stɔːrm/

(Definition of “storm” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"storm" in American English

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stormnoun [ C ]

us /stɔrm/

storm noun [ C ] (VIOLENT WEATHER)

an extreme weather condition with strong winds and heavy rain or snow:

The storm left over a foot of snow on the ground.

storm noun [ C ] (STRONG FEELING)

a strong expression of feeling, esp. in reaction to a statement or event:

The new rent regulations raised a storm of criticism from both renters and landlords.

stormverb

us /stɔrm/

storm verb (ATTACK)

[ T ] to attack a place or building suddenly:

Officers stormed the building the demonstrators had occupied.

storm verb (SHOW STRONG FEELING)

[ I always + adv/prep ] to move quickly and forcefully to show you are angry:

Henry stormed into Giffen’s office waving a copy of the newspaper and yelling at the top of his lungs.

(Definition of “storm” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)