stress Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “stress” in the English Dictionary

"stress" in British English

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stressnoun

uk   us   /stres/

stress noun (WORRY)

B1 [C or U] greatworrycaused by a ​difficultsituation, or something that ​causes this ​condition: People under a lot of stress may ​experienceheadaches, ​minorpains, and ​sleeping difficulties. Yoga is a very ​effectivetechnique for combating stress. the stresses and ​strains of the ​job stress-​relatedillness
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stress noun (PRONUNCIATION)

B2 [C or U] the way that a word or ​syllable is ​pronounced with ​greaterforce than other words in the same ​sentence or other ​syllables in the same word: The ​meaning of a ​sentence often ​depends on stress and ​intonation. When "​insert" is a ​verb, the stress is on the second ​syllable, but when it is a ​noun, the stress is on the first ​syllable.
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stress noun (FORCE)

[C or U] specialized physics, engineering a ​force that ​acts in a way that often ​changes the ​shape of an ​object: Computers ​work out the stresses that such a ​craft will ​encounter in ​flight. Jogging puts a lot of stress onyourkneejoints.

stress noun (EMPHASIS)

C1 [U] emphasis: During his ​speech, he laidparticular stress on the ​freedom of the ​press.

stressverb

uk   us   /stres/

stress verb (EMPHASIZE)

B2 [T] to give ​emphasis or ​specialimportance to something: [+ (that)] He is ​careful to stress (that) the laboratory's ​safetystandards are the ​best in the ​country. I'd just like to stress the ​importance ofneatness and ​politeness in this ​job.
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stress verb (PRONOUNCE)

B2 [T] to ​pronounce a word or ​syllable with ​greaterforce than other words in the same ​sentence or other ​syllables in the same word, or to ​play a ​musicalnote with ​greaterforce than ​others in a ​group: In the word "​engine" you should stress the first ​syllable.
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stress verb (WORRY)

[I] to ​feelworried and ​nervous: Don't stress over it - we'll ​soon get it ​sorted out.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of stress from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"stress" in American English

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stressnoun

 us   /stres/

stress noun (WORRY)

[C/U] worry caused by a ​difficultsituation, or something that ​causes this ​condition: [U] Luis is under a lot of stress ​right now. [C] It’s hard to ​cope with the stresses of ​raising a ​family.

stress noun (FORCE)

[C/U] a ​force that ​tends to ​change the ​shape or ​strength of an ​object: [U] If a ​metalobjectexperiencesconstant stress, it may ​bend or ​break.

stress noun (PRONOUNCING WORD)

English [C/U] the ​pronouncing of a word or ​syllable with ​greaterforce than other words in the same ​sentence or other ​syllables in the same word: [C] The ​main stress in the word "​command" is on the second ​syllable.

stress noun (IMPORTANCE)

[U] specialimportance or ​emphasis that is given to something: There’s ​constant stress on ​status in this ​community.
stressful
adjective  us   /ˈstres·fəl/
Working in the ​emergencyroom of a ​majorhospital is ​highly stressful ​work.

stressverb [T]

 us   /stres/

stress verb [T] (GIVE IMPORTANCE)

to give ​specialimportance or ​emphasis to something: I’d like to stress the ​differences between ​ouropinions.

stress verb [T] (PRONOUNCE)

English to ​pronounce a word or ​syllable with ​greaterforce than other words in the same ​sentence or other ​syllables in the same word: In the word "​engine," you should stress the first ​syllable.
(Definition of stress from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"stress" in Business English

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stressnoun

uk   us   /stres/
[C or U] a ​feeling of worry and unhappiness because you have too much ​work or too many problems to ​deal with: Successful ​managers need to be able to make tough decisions under stress. She was off ​work for four weeks with a stress-related illness. More women are now ​workingfull-time, with all the stresses and strains that ​brings. Workplace ​culture is an important ​factor inlevels of stress. stress ​management/​reduction work/​workplace/​occupational stresscope with/deal with/handle stress Firms need to ​find ways of helping ​executivesdeal with stress.experience/suffer from stress According to the ​survey, over half a million ​workers believed they suffered from stress.reduce/relieve/ease stress Flexible ​workpolicies can ​reduce stress.be under stress People who are under stress are more likely to have accidents at ​work.cause (sb) stress Delays in ​payment cause stress and ​financialhardship.a cause/source of stress Work is the third most ​frequent cause of stress.take the stress out of sth Satellite-navigation ​systems take the stress out of ​driving.
[C or U] problems caused by a difficult ​situation: financial/​fiscal stressbe under stress Many of our ​businesses are under stress ​right now because of the ​sloweconomy.stress(es) on sth Disappointing ​figures have once again ​highlighted stresses on the ​publicfinances.place/put/reduce stress on sth A new ​transmissionline would ​reduce stress on electricity ​systems across the mid-Atlantic ​region.
place/lay/put stress on sth if an ​official speech or ​reportplaces, ​lays, or puts stress on something, it emphasizes it: We should ​develop a more ​dynamic conception of ​equality, ​placing more stress on ​opportunity.

stressverb

uk   us   /stres/
[T] to emphasize something: We want to stress how careful we are when ​assessingcreditrisk. It is important to stress thateconomic and ​social cohesion is a ​politicalpriority of the ​European Union. With the ​growth of the ​Internet, I cannot stress how important it is for new ​businesses to ​act fast in ​registeringtrademarks. The ​report stressed that by ​proactivelydealing with climate-change ​issues, ​companies can ​earn a voice in ​planningpolicy.stress the importance/need The ​group has ​spent much of its ​time stressing the need for ​debtrelief for Africa.be keen/at pains/quick to stress After the ​budget, the ​Chancellor was ​keen to stress how the ​averageearner with two children will be better off.
[I] informal to become very worried or unhappy because you have too much ​work or too many problems to ​deal with: Try not to stress too much about things.
(Definition of stress from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“stress” in Business English

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