string Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “string” in the English Dictionary

"string" in British English

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stringnoun

uk   us   /strɪŋ/
  • string noun (ROPE)

B2 [C or U] (a ​piece of) ​strong, ​thinrope made by ​twisting very ​thinthreads together, used for ​fastening and ​tying things: a ​packagetied with string a ​ball/​piece of string When you pull the strings, the puppet's ​arms and ​legsmove. [C] a set of ​objectsjoined together in a ​row on a ​singlerope or ​thread: a string of beads/​pearls A string ofonionshung from a ​beam in the ​kitchen.

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  • a ​loop of string
  • tangled string
  • Could you ​tie this ​piece of string for me?
  • He ​wound the string into a ​ball.
  • Could you ​roll up that string for me?
  • string noun (SERIES)

C2 [C] a ​series of ​related things or ​events: What do you ​think of the ​recent string ofpoliticalscandals? He had a string of top-20 hits during the 80s.

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  • string noun (MUSIC)

B2 [C] a ​thinwire that is ​stretchedacross a ​musicalinstrument and is used to ​produce a ​range of ​notesdepending on ​itsthickness, ​length, and ​tightness: A ​violin has four strings. Guitar strings are made from ​steel or ​nylon. You can pluck the strings on a ​guitar with ​yourfingers or a ​plectrum. a twelve-string ​guitarstrings [plural] the ​group of ​instruments that have strings and are ​played with a bow or with the ​fingers, or the ​players in a ​musicalgroup who ​play these ​instruments: I ​prefer his ​compositions for strings. He ​played the ​cello and ​joined the strings in the ​schoolorchestra.
  • string noun (SPORT)

[C] one of the ​thinplastic strings that are ​stretched between the ​sides of the ​frame of a racket used in ​sport
  • string noun (COMPUTING)

[C] specialized computing a usually ​shortpiece of ​text consisting of ​letters, ​numbers, or ​symbols that is used in ​computerprocesses such as ​searching through ​largeamounts of ​information: If you ​type in the search string "ing", the ​computer will ​find all the words ​containing "ing".

stringadjective

uk   us   /strɪŋ/
consisting of or ​relating to string ​instruments: the string ​section a string ​quartet

stringverb [T]

uk   us   /strɪŋ/ (strung, strung)
(Definition of string from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"string" in American English

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stringnoun

 us   /strɪŋ/
  • string noun (CORD)

[C/U] a ​thinlength of ​cord: [U] a ​piece of string
  • string noun (MUSIC)

[C] a ​thinwire or ​cord that is ​stretchedacross a ​musicalinstrument and ​producesmusicalnotes when ​pulled or ​hit: Guitar strings are made from ​steel or ​nylon. [C] The strings in an ​orchestra is a ​group of ​instruments that ​producesound with strings: Violins, ​cellos, and ​doublebasses are all strings.
  • string noun (SET)

[C] a set of ​objectsjoined together in a ​row on a ​singlecord or ​thread: a string of ​pearls
  • string noun (SERIES)

[C] a ​series of ​related things or ​events: He told the ​committee a string of ​lies. Her new ​novel is the ​latest in a string of successes.

stringverb [T]

 us   /strɪŋ/ (past tense and past participle strung  /strʌŋ/ )
  • string verb [T] (ATTACH CORD)

to ​attach a ​length of string or something ​similar by the ​ends, so that the ​middlehangs: They strung ​ribbons of ​brightpaper around the ​room in ​preparation for the ​party.
  • string verb [T] (JOIN IN SET)

to put a ​thread or ​cord through each of a set of things: The ​childsat on the ​floor, stringing ​woodenbeads. fig. I can just ​barely string together (= say) a ​couple of ​sentences in Japanese.
(Definition of string from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"string" in Business English

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stringnoun [C]

uk   us   /strɪŋ/
pull strings (also US pull wires) to use your ​power or ​influence to get what you want: She became a journalist for one of the UK's ​topnewspapers after her father ​pulled strings.
pull the strings the ​person who ​pulls the strings in a particular ​organization, ​situation, etc. makes the important decisions about it and ​controls it: Shareholders are ​concerned because they no ​longer really know who is ​pulling the strings at the ​bank.
(Definition of string from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“string” in Business English

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