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Meaning of “style” in the English Dictionary

"style" in British English

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stylenoun

uk   /staɪl/  us   /staɪl/
  • style noun (WAY)

B1 [C or U] a way of doing something, ​especially one that is ​typical of a ​person, ​group of ​people, ​place, or ​period: Jones ​favours a ​dynamic, ​hands-on style ofmanagement. His ​office is very ​utilitarian in style, with no ​decoration.
be your style informal
to be the ​type of thing that you would do: He wouldn't ​try to ​mislead you - it's not his style.

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  • style noun (FASHION)

B1 [C or U] fashion, ​especially in ​clothing: a style ​consultant I ​read the ​fashionpages in the ​newspapers to ​keep up with the ​latest styles. The ​classicblackdress is always in style.

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  • style noun (DESIGN)

B1 [C] a ​particularshape or ​design, ​especially of a person's ​hair, ​clothes, or a ​piece of ​furniture: a ​formal style ofhat Her ​hair was ​cut in a really ​nice style.
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  • style noun (HIGH QUALITY)

B2 [U] approving high ​quality in ​appearance, ​design, or ​behaviour: That ​car's got ​real style, which is no ​surpriseconsidering how much it ​cost. When she ​decides to do something, she always does it in/withgreat style.

styleverb [T]

uk   /staɪl/  us   /staɪl/
  • style verb [T] (DESIGN)

to ​shape or ​design something such as a person's ​hair or an ​object like a ​piece of ​clothing or ​furniture, ​especially so that it ​looksattractive: You've had ​yourhair styled - it really ​suits you. This ​range of ​jackets is styled to ​look good whatever the ​occasion.

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  • style verb [T] (TITLE)

to give a ​title to a ​person or ​group: [+ noun] She styles herself "Doctor" but she doesn't have a ​degree.
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-stylesuffix

uk   / -staɪl/  us   / -staɪl/
(Definition of style from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"style" in American English

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stylenoun

 us   /stɑɪl/
  • style noun (WAY)

[C/U] a way of doing something, esp. one that is ​typical of a ​person, ​group of ​people, ​place, or ​time: [C] Puente ​fusedLatin with other ​musical styles. [C] The ​book is written in the style of an 18th-century ​novel. [U] His ​portraits were ​awkward in style.
[C/U] Style is also a ​specialquality that makes a ​person or thing ​seem different and ​attractive: [U] I like this ​team – the ​players have style.
  • style noun (DESIGN)

[C] a ​particularform or ​design: They had hundreds of styles of ​lightfixtures in ​stock.
[C] Style also ​meansfashion: [C] I ​keep up with the ​latest styles. [U] The ​classicblackdress is always in style.
art [C] Style also refers to ​particularfeatures of ​art that are ​found in a ​group of ​artists who ​lived and ​worked at the same ​time.

styleverb [T]

 us   /stɑɪl/
  • style verb [T] (DESIGN)

to ​arrange or ​designhair, ​clothes, a ​room, etc., esp. so that it ​looksattractive: Most women style ​theirhair.
(Definition of style from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"style" in Business English

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stylenoun [C]

uk   us   /staɪl/
a way of doing something, especially one that is typical of a ​person, ​group of ​people, ​place, or ​period: management/leadership style An authoritarian ​management style may not ​yield good ​results. Those familiar with her personal style say she is quietly decisive. a working/​learning style
See also
(Definition of style from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“style” in American English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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