subject Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “subject” in the English Dictionary

"subject" in British English

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subjectnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/
  • subject noun [C] (AREA OF DISCUSSION)

B1 the thing that is being ​discussed, ​considered, or ​studied: Our subject for ​discussion is ​homelessness. She has made a ​series of ​documentaries on the subject offamilyrelationships. The ​guestlecturer took as her subject (= ​decided to ​speak about) "​punishment and ​imprisonment in ​modernsociety". The ​number of ​planesflying over the ​town has been the subject of (= has ​caused)concern since last ​summer.

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  • subject noun [C] (AREA OF STUDY)

A1 an ​area of ​knowledge that is ​studied in ​school, ​college, or ​university: My ​favourite subjects at ​school were ​history and ​English.mainly UK Her subject (= ​specialarea of ​study) is low-temperature ​physics.change the subject B2 to ​starttalking about a different subject: I'd ​tried to ​explain the ​situation, but he just ​changed the subject.
  • subject noun [C] (STORY/PAINTING)

C2 a ​person, thing, or ​situation that is written about in a ​book, ​article, etc. or ​shown in a ​picture, etc.: The ​mill by the ​bridge was the subject of an ​unfinishedpainting by J. M. W. Turner.
  • subject noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

B1 specialized language the ​person or thing that ​performs the ​action of a ​verb, or is ​joined to a ​description by a ​verb: "​Bob" is the subject of the ​sentence "​Bobthrew the ​ball."
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  • subject noun [C] (PERSON)

a ​person who ​lives in or who has the ​right to ​live in a ​particularcountry, ​especially a ​country with a ​king or ​queen: He is a British subject.
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Grammar

subjectverb [T]

uk   us   /səbˈdʒekt/
to ​defeatpeople or a ​country and then ​control them against ​theirwishes and ​limittheirfreedom: The ​invadersquickly subjected the ​localtribes.
Phrasal verbs

subjectadjective

uk   us   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"subject" in American English

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subjectnoun [C]

 us   /ˈsʌb·dʒɪkt, -dʒekt/
  • subject noun [C] (AREA OF DISCUSSION)

something that is being ​discussed or ​considered: School ​officialsbroached the subject of ​extending the ​schoolyear. It ​seemed like a good ​idea to ​change the subject.
  • subject noun [C] (SCHOOL COURSE)

an ​area of ​knowledge that is ​studied in ​school or ​college: My ​favorite subjects are ​history and ​geography.
  • subject noun [C] (PERSON)

a ​person who ​lives or who has the ​right to ​live in a ​particularcountry, esp. a ​country with a ​king or ​queen: a British subject
  • subject noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

grammar the ​person or thing that ​performs the ​action of a ​verb, or which is ​joined to a ​description by a ​verb: "Bob" is the subject of the ​sentence, "Bob ​threw the ​ball."
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"subject" in Business English

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subjectadjective

uk   us   /ˈsʌbdʒɪkt/
subject to sth likely to have or ​experience a particular thing, especially something unpleasant: be subject to a charge/fee/tariff You may be subject to ​additionalbankcharges for ​currencyconversion. The ​company could be subject to a ​hostiletakeover. Income from ​investment of the ​capital will be subject to ​tax. depending on the ​stated thing ​happening: The $1.14 ​billionproject is subject to ​approval by the ​board. Outline ​planningpermission has been ​granted, subject to a ​publicinquiry, for a new 10,000-seat stadium on the ​land. Tax ​laws are subject to ​change. The ​noticeperiod for ​clients to ​leave the ​agency are subject to ​contract. under the ​politicalcontrol or ​authority of something: The ​casinos are ​located on tribal ​lands not subject to ​state or ​locallaws.
subject to average INSURANCE used about an ​insuranceagreement when the ​amount of ​insurance on a ​property is less than the ​realvalue of the ​property, so the ​amountpaid out by the ​company will be ​reduced: You must adequately ​insure yourself otherwise you may ​find yourself subject to ​average.
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“subject” in Business English

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