Meaning of “subordinate” in the English Dictionary

"subordinate" in British English

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subordinateadjective

uk /səˈbɔː.dɪ.nət/ us /səˈbɔːr.dən.ət/

subordinatenoun [ C ]

uk /səˈbɔː.dɪ.nət/ us /səˈbɔːr.dən.ət/

subordinateverb [ T ]

uk /səˈbɔː.dɪ.neɪt/ us /səˈbɔːr.dən.eɪt/

(Definition of “subordinate” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"subordinate" in American English

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subordinateadjective

us /səˈbɔr·dən·ət/

having a lower or less important position:

I’m happy in a subordinate role.
subordinate
noun [ C ] us /səˈbɔr·dən·ət/

You need to assign this job to a subordinate.

subordinateverb [ T ]

us /səˈbɔr·dənˌeɪt/

to treat someone or something as less important than something else:

Japan has a tradition of subordinating individual desires to group goals.
subordination
noun [ U ] /səˌbɔr·dənˈeɪ·ʃən/

She studies patterns of domination and subordination among orangutans.

(Definition of “subordinate” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"subordinate" in Business English

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subordinateadjective

uk /səˈbɔːdənət/ us

WORKPLACE having less power or a lower position than someone else in a company or an organization:

subordinate to sb The condition of motherhood often makes women subordinate to men in the workplace.
a subordinate employee/position/role Before reaching the level of head chef, there was the hard work and subordinate positions in kitchens.
Women are in the minority in the office and are of subordinate status to most of their male colleagues.

less important than something else:

Primary legislation can be amended; subordinate legislation cannot.
subordinate to sth The institute will make the acquired debt subordinate to any new bank lending.

[ before noun ] FINANCE →  subordinated

subordinatenoun [ C ]

uk /səˈbɔːdənət/ us

WORKPLACE a person who has a less important position than you in a company or an organization:

Senior managers had to convince their colleagues and subordinates of the value of this approach.

subordinateverb [ T ]

uk /səˈbɔːdɪneɪt/ us

to put someone or something into a less important position:

Management found itself subordinated to the markets.

(Definition of “subordinate” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)