substitute Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “substitute” in the English Dictionary

"substitute" in British English

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substituteverb

uk   /ˈsʌb.stɪ.tʃuːt/ us   /ˈsʌb.stə.tuːt/
B2 [T] to use something or someone instead of another thing or person: You can substitute oil for butter in this recipe. Dayton was substituted for Williams in the second half of the game.
substitute for sth
to perform the same job as another thing or to take its place: Gas-fired power stations will substitute for less efficient coal-fired equipment.

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substitutenoun [C]

uk   /ˈsʌb.stɪ.tʃuːt/ us   /ˈsʌb.stə.tuːt/
B2 a thing or person that is used instead of another thing or person: Tofu can be used as a meat substitute in vegetarian recipes. Vitamins should not be used as a substitute for a healthy diet.
informal sub in sports, a player who is used for part of a game instead of another player: Johnson came on as a substitute towards the end of the game. The manager brought on another substitute in the final minutes of the game.
there is no substitute for sth
nothing is as good as the stated thing: You can read about other countries, but there's no substitute for visiting them yourself.
US informal sub a substitute teacher

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(Definition of substitute from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"substitute" in American English

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substituteverb [I/T]

us   /ˈsʌb·stɪˌtut/
to use someone or something instead of another person or thing: [T] You can substitute oil for butter in this recipe. [I] He was called on to substitute for the ailing star last night.
substitute
noun [C] us   /ˈsʌb·stɪˌtut/
Talk is a poor substitute for action.
(Definition of substitute from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"substitute" in Business English

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substituteverb

uk   /ˈsʌbstɪtjuːt/ us  
[T] to use something different or new instead of another thing: substitute sth for sth Industry must reduce fuel consumption by substituting alternative fuels for fossil fuels.substitute sth with sth It takes time to substitute local brands with your own brand names.
substitute for sb [I]
WORKPLACE to take the place of another person or do their job for a period of time: She was asked to substitute for the absent committee chairman.
substitute for sth [I]
to do the same job as another thing or take its place: The government expects natural gas to substitute for oil exports in the future. Many dot.com companies have learnt that technology can never substitute for customer service.

substitutenoun [C]

uk   /ˈsʌbstɪtjuːt/ us  
something different or new that is used instead of another thing: (as) a substitute for sth We are looking at the possibility of using foreign production as a substitute for exports to foreign markets.cheap/good/poor substitutes Cheaper substitutes displaced the product from the world market. egg/fat/meat substitutes Early warning of a layoff is no substitute for a job.
WORKPLACE someone who takes the place of another person or does their job for a period of time: a substitute for sb Fixed-term contract workers and agency workers are not always direct substitutes for one another.
there's no substitute for sth/doing sth
nothing else is as good as the stated thing or action: In this industry, there's no substitute for experience.
(Definition of substitute from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“substitute” in British English

“substitute” in American English

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