Meaning of “suck” in the English Dictionary

"suck" in British English

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suckverb

uk /sʌk/ us /sʌk/

suck verb (PULL IN)

C2 [ I or T ] to pull in liquid or air through your mouth without using your teeth, or to move the tongue and muscles of the mouth around something inside your mouth, often in order to dissolve it:

She was sitting on the grass sucking lemonade through a straw.
I sucked my thumb until I was seven.
I tried sucking (on) a mint to stop myself coughing.

[ T + adv/prep ] Something that sucks a liquid or an object in a particular direction pulls it with great force:

The waves came crashing over my head and I could feel myself being sucked under by the currents.
figurative Continued rapid growth in consumer spending will suck in (= encourage) more imports.

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sucknoun [ C usually singular ]

uk /sʌk/ us /sʌk/

the action of sucking something:

Can I have a suck of your lollipop, please?

(Definition of “suck” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"suck" in American English

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suckverb

us /sʌk/

suck verb (PULL IN)

[ I/T ] to pull liquid or air into your mouth without using your teeth, or to move the tongue and muscles of the mouth around something inside your mouth, often in order to dissolve it:

[ T ] The two-year-old sucked his thumb.
[ I ] Sometimes a baby will hold the pacifier in her mouth without really sucking.
[ I/T ] We were all sucking (on) lollipops.

[ I/T ] Something that sucks something in a particular direction pulls it with great force:

suck verb (BE BAD)

[ I ] slang to be bad or worthless:

We all thought the movie sucked.

(Definition of “suck” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)