sucker Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “sucker” in the English Dictionary

"sucker" in British English

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suckernoun

uk   /ˈsʌk.ər/  us   //
  • sucker noun (STICKING DEVICE)

[C] something that ​helps an ​animal or ​object to ​stick to a ​surface: The ​leech has a sucker at each end of ​itsbody. UK informal for suction cup
  • sucker noun (PLANT PART)

[C] specialized biology a new ​growth on an ​existingplant that ​develops under the ​ground from the ​root or the ​mainstem, or from the ​stem below a graft (= ​part where a new ​plant has been ​joined on)
  • sucker noun (FOOLISH PERSON)

[C] informal disapproving a ​person who ​believes everything they are told and is ​thereforeeasy to ​deceive: You didn't ​actuallybelieve him when he said he had a ​yacht, did you? Oh, Annie, you sucker!be a sucker for sth informal to like something so much that you cannot ​refuse it or ​judgeitsrealvalue: I have to ​confess I'm a sucker formusicals.
(Definition of sucker from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"sucker" in American English

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suckernoun [C]

 us   /ˈsʌk·ər/
  • sucker noun [C] (FOOLISH PERSON)

infml a ​person who ​believes everything you say and is ​thereforeeasy to ​deceive infml If you are a sucker for something, you like it so much that you cannot ​refuse it: Josie’s a sucker for ​burntalmondicecream.
  • sucker noun [C] (THING)

infml used to refer to a thing that is ​surprising or that is causing ​trouble: My ​car won’t ​start again, and ​hopefully between the two of us we can ​figure out how to make that sucker ​work.
  • sucker noun [C] (CANDY)

a ​lollipop
(Definition of sucker from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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