Meaning of “surgery” in the English Dictionary

"surgery" in British English

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surgerynoun

uk /ˈsɜː.dʒər.i/ us /ˈsɝː.dʒər.i/

surgery noun (MEDICAL OPERATION)

B2 [ U ] the treatment of injuries or diseases in people or animals by cutting open the body and removing or repairing the damaged part:

The patient had/underwent surgery on his heart.
He made a good recovery after surgery to remove a brain tumour.

More examples

  • With something as delicate as brain surgery, there is little margin for error .
  • Heart surgery exacts tremendous skill and concentration.
  • In the 1870s and 1880s, doctors began to follow the principles of antiseptic surgery.
  • Ligatures are used in surgery to stop the flow of a bleeding artery.
  • Without surgery, this animal will die slowly and painfully.

surgery noun (ADVICE)

B2 [ C or U ] UK US office a place where you can go to ask advice from or receive treatment from a doctor or dentist:

If you come to the surgery at 10.30, the doctor will see you then.
On Saturday mornings, surgery (= the period of opening of the place where you can go to see your doctor) is from 9.00 to 12.00.

[ C ] UK the regular period of time when a person can visit their Member of Parliament to ask advice:

Our MP holds a weekly surgery on Friday mornings.

(Definition of “surgery” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"surgery" in American English

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surgerynoun [ C/U ]

us /ˈsɜr·dʒə·ri/

the treatment of injuries or diseases by cutting open the body and removing or repairing the damaged part, or an operation of this type:

[ U ] He had undergone open-heart surgery two years ago.
[ U ] I’m recovering from back surgery, so it’s going to be awhile before I can ride a horse again.
[ C ] She has undergone several surgeries and will require more.

Br The surgery is a doctor’s office where you go to be examined.

surgical
adjective [ not gradable ] us /ˈsɜr·dʒɪ·kəl/

(Definition of “surgery” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)