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Meaning of “surplus” in the English Dictionary

"surplus" in British English

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surplusnoun [C or U], adjective

uk   /ˈsɜː.pləs/  us   /ˈsɝː.pləs/
C2 (an ​amount that is) more than is ​needed: The ​world is now ​producinglargefood surpluses. We are ​unlikely to ​produce any surplus this ​year. The ​government has ​authorized the ​army to ​sellits surplus ​weapons.UK The ​store is ​selling off ​stock that is surplus to ​requirements (= more than they need to have).
the ​amount of ​money you have ​left when you ​sell more than you ​buy, or ​spend less than you own: a ​budget/​trade surplus Fortunately the company's ​bankaccount is ​currently in surplus.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of surplus from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"surplus" in American English

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surplusnoun [C]

 us   /ˈsɜrˌplʌs, -pləs/
an ​amount that is more than is ​needed: The ​world is now ​producinglargefood surpluses. The ​government is forecasting a ​budget surplus this ​year (= all the ​moneyavailable to be ​spent will not be ​spent).
A surplus is also the ​amount of ​money you have ​left when you ​sell more than you ​buy: a ​trade surplus
surplus
adjective [not gradable]  us   /ˈsɜr·plʌs, -pləs/
Farmers are ​feedingtheir surplus ​wheat to ​pigs.
(Definition of surplus from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"surplus" in Business English

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surplusnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈsɜːpləs/
an ​amount that is more than is needed: a surplus of sth The ​plant had a surplus of ​components.
ACCOUNTING, ECONOMICS the ​amount of ​money that you have ​left when you ​sell more than you ​buy, or ​spend less than you receive: The ​savings will ​create a surplus of a little more than $24 million. The ​overallgap continues to reflect a ​deficit in the ​trade of ​goods and a surplus in ​services.
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in surplus
used to describe a ​situation when a ​business or country has ​spent less ​money than it has received: This ​year the ​budget will be in surplus.

surplusadjective

uk   us   /ˈsɜːpləs/
more than is needed or used: As the ​economyslowed, ​companies that had ​invested surplus ​funds in the ​stockmarketfound their ​returnsdwindling. The ​form of the ​payout of surplus ​cash to ​investors will be revealed in May.
(Definition of surplus from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“surplus” in American English

“surplus” in Business English

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