surrender Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “surrender” in the English Dictionary

"surrender" in British English

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surrenderverb

uk   /sərˈen.dər/  us   /səˈren.dɚ/

surrender verb (ACCEPT DEFEAT)

C2 [I] to ​stopfighting and ​admitdefeat: They would ​ratherdie than surrender (to the ​invaders). [I] If you surrender to an ​experience or ​emotion, you ​stoptrying to ​prevent or ​control it: I ​finally surrendered totemptation, and ​ate the last ​piece of ​chocolate.
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surrender verb (GIVE)

[T] to give something that is yours to someone ​else because you have been ​forced to do so or because it is ​necessary to do so: The ​policedemanded that the ​gang surrender ​theirweapons. Neither ​side is ​willing to surrender any ​territory/any of ​theirclaims.

surrendernoun [C or U]

uk   /sərˈen.dər/  us   /səˈren.dɚ/
the ​act of ​stoppingfighting and ​officiallyadmittingdefeat: The ​rebels are on the ​point of surrender.
(Definition of surrender from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"surrender" in American English

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surrenderverb

 us   /səˈren·dər/

surrender verb (ACCEPT DEFEAT)

[I] to ​stopfighting and ​acceptdefeat: They would ​ratherdie than surrender.

surrender verb (GIVE)

[T] to give something that is yours to someone ​else, usually because you have been ​forced to do so: U.S. Magistrate Celeste Bremer ​restricted Gruenwald’s ​travel and ​ordered that he surrender his ​passport.

surrendernoun [C/U]

 us   /səˈren·dər/
an ​agreement to ​stopfighting and ​acceptdefeat: [C] Robert E. Lee’s surrender, which ​ended the Civil War, was one of the most ​importantevents in American ​history.
(Definition of surrender from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"surrender" in Business English

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surrenderverb [T]

uk   us   /səˈrendər/
to give up something or ​control over something: Generally, the ​amountpaid by the ​lessee to surrender the ​lease will be ​liable to ​capitalgainstax. Britain may be ​forced to surrender at least some of its ​votingpower in the ​IMF.surrender sth to sb He was ​grantedbail, on ​condition that he surrender his ​passport to the ​authorities.
INSURANCE to end an ​insurancepolicy early, before its ​original end ​date: Policy-holders who need to ​dispose of their ​policies can see if they would do better to ​sell rather than surrender the ​policy.
FINANCE to ​losevalue: Yesterday on the ​moneymarkets the ​euro surrendered its earlier ​gains against the ​dollar.

surrendernoun [C or U]

uk   us   /səˈrendər/
the ​act of giving up something, or giving ​control of something to someone else: The ​penalty for early surrender of ​pensions remains at 25%. The ​union was ​forced into a surrender of some recent ​gains in the latest round of ​negotiations.
INSURANCE the ​act of ​ending an ​insurance policy early, before its ​original end ​date: You will have to ​pay a ​fee for the early surrender of your ​policy.
(Definition of surrender from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“surrender” in Business English

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