Meaning of “survey” in the English Dictionary

"survey" in English

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surveynoun [ C ]

uk /ˈsɜː.veɪ/ us /ˈsɝː.veɪ/

surveyverb

uk /səˈveɪ/ /ˈsɜː.veɪ/ us /sɚˈveɪ/

survey verb (LOOK AT)

C1 [ T ] formal uk /səˈveɪ/ us /ˈsɝː.veɪ/ to look at or examine all of something, especially carefully:

He got out of the car to survey the damage.
She has written a book which surveys (= describes in detail) the history of feminism.

[ T ] uk /səˈveɪ/ us /ˈsɝː.veɪ/ to measure an area of land, and to record the details of it, especially on a map:

Before the new railway was built, its route was carefully surveyed.

[ T often passive ] UK US and Australian English inspect uk /səˈveɪ/ us /ˈsɝː.veɪ/ If a building is surveyed, it is examined carefully by a specially trained person, in order to discover if there is anything wrong with its structure.

(Definition of “survey” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"survey" in American English

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surveynoun [ C ]

us /ˈsɜr·veɪ/

survey noun [ C ] (QUESTIONS)

a set of questions people are asked to gather information or find out their opinions, or the information gathered by asking many people the same questions:

survey noun [ C ] (MEASURING)

the measuring and recording of the details of an area of land:

Geological surveys are an important tool used in locating oil reserves.

survey noun [ C ] (EXAMINING)

a description of the whole of a subject:

His new book is a survey of contemporary Latin American architecture.

surveyverb [ T ]

us /sərˈveɪ, ˈsɜr·veɪ/

survey verb [ T ] (LOOK AT)

to look at or examine all of something:

After we’d finished painting the kitchen, we stood back and surveyed our work.

survey verb [ T ] (MEASURE)

to measure and describe the details of an area of land:

The property must be surveyed before you can buy it.

survey verb [ T ] (ASK QUESTIONS)

to ask people questions in order to find out about their opinions and behavior:

Researchers surveyed the political opinions of 2000 college students.

(Definition of “survey” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"survey" in Business English

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surveynoun [ C ]

uk /ˈsɜːveɪ/ us

MARKETING an examination of people's opinions, behaviour, etc. made, for example, by asking them questions:

a survey finds/reveals/shows A survey of 584 companies has found that there is no relationship between a company's sales incentive plan structure and its gain or loss in market share.
conduct/carry out/do a survey We should conduct a survey to find out what our customers really want.

PROPERTY the measuring and recording of the details of an area of land:

A detailed survey of the building plot has already been carried out.

UK US inspection PROPERTY an examination of the structure of a building by a specially trained person to check what condition it is in:

We should schedule an independent survey of the property before we agree to buy it.
The survey revealed a number of problems that will have to be repaired.

surveyverb [ T ]

uk /səˈveɪ/ us

MARKETING to ask people questions in order to find out about their opinions or behaviour:

The researchers surveyed the attitudes of 2,500 night shift workers.

to look at or examine all of something in detail:

She has written a book which surveys the history of the PR industry.

PROPERTY to measure an area of land and to record the details of it:

The land will have to be surveyed in detail before the building project can begin.

UK US inspect PROPERTY when a building is surveyed, it is examined carefully by a specially trained person, to see what condition it is in:

We had the house surveyed.

(Definition of “survey” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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survey

A survey shows that in many countries 60 % to 80 % of the population is against consuming products developed through genetic engineering, out of anxiety about their effect on human health.
Even though we may have different views on certain parts of it, we should be able to agree that this survey is useful and significant.
Nearly 40% of businesses in this survey are still reporting additional costs to render products or services compatible with national specifications.
A recent survey shows that more than half the legislative proposals put forward over the past year were adopted in two readings and almost a fifth required only one reading.
The 1999-2000 household budget survey shows that almost 60% of farm household income now comes from non-farm sources, contributing to the future viability of many farms.
The fears are exaggerated; every survey shows that the free movement of workers, or the demand for it, is not significant in scale.
The survey findings also show that we cannot relax our efforts; we cannot overlook what is no longer a 'new' disease.
Also, the doubling of the fiscal consolidation effort called for in the survey is going to choke off any possibility of achieving the 2020 process goals.
The report is a broad survey of the various instruments aimed at ensuring the establishment of an area of freedom, security and justice.
Indeed, the most recent survey suggests that bank charges vary more widely around the average than they did in the mid-80s at the beginning of the single market programme.