Meaning of “sway” in the English Dictionary

"sway" in British English

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swayverb

uk /sweɪ/ us /sweɪ/

sway verb (MOVE)

[ I ] to move slowly from side to side:

The trees were swaying in the wind.
The movement of the ship caused the mast to sway from side to side/back and forth.
A drunk was standing in the middle of the street, swaying uncertainly and trying hard to stay upright.

[ T ] to cause something to move or change:

Recent developments have swayed the balance of power in the region.

sway verb (PERSUADE)

[ T ] to persuade someone to believe or do one thing rather than another:

Her speech failed to sway her colleagues into supporting the plan.

swaynoun [ U ]

uk /sweɪ/ us /sweɪ/ formal

(Definition of “sway” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"sway" in American English

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swayverb

us /sweɪ/

sway verb (MOVE)

[ I ] to move slowly from side to side:

The trees sway in the wind.

sway verb (PERSUADE)

[ T ] to persuade someone to believe or to do something:

Were you swayed by her arguments?

swaynoun [ U ]

us /sweɪ/

sway noun [ U ] (MOVEMENT)

a slow movement from side to side:

The car showed lots of sway in crosswinds.

sway noun [ U ] (ABILITY TO PERSUADE)

the ability to persuade:

As a young musician, he fell under the sway of Louis Armstrong.
Large corporations hold sway with Congress.

(Definition of “sway” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)