swing Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “swing” in the English Dictionary

"swing" in British English

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swingverb

uk   us   /swɪŋ/ (swung, swung)

swing verb (MOVE SIDEWAYS)

B2 [I or T] to ​moveeasily and without ​interruptionbackwards and ​forwards or from one ​side to the other, ​especially from a ​fixedpoint, or to ​cause something or someone to do this: He ​walkedbriskly along swinging his rolled-up ​umbrella. The ​door swung ​open. [I or T] to ​move an ​object or ​yourfist in an ​attempt to ​hit something or someone: I swung (the ​bat) and ​missed. He swung his ​fist towards Ben's ​face. [I] to ​change: His mood swings betweenelation and ​despair.
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swing verb (BE EXCITING)

[I] informal to be ​exciting and ​enjoyable: You need ​music to make a party swing.

swing verb (MUSIC)

[I or T] to ​playmusic in a ​strong, ​excitingstyle like jazz, or (of ​music) to be ​played in this way

swing verb (ARRANGE)

[T] informal to ​arrange for something to ​happen, by ​persuadingpeople and often by ​actingslightlydishonestly: If you ​want an ​interview with Pedro, I could ​probably swing it (for you).

swingnoun

uk   us   /swɪŋ/

swing noun (SIDEWAYS MOVEMENT)

[C] a swinging ​movement [C] an ​attempt to ​hit someone: The ​drunk took a ​wild swing at Harry. [C] a ​change: He ​experiencessevere mood swings (= ​suddenchanges from one ​extrememood to another). The ​party only ​needs a five ​percent swing (= ​needs five ​percent of ​voters to ​change to ​supporting it) to ​win this ​election.
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swing noun (SEAT)

B2 [C] a ​seatjoined by two ​ropes or ​chains to a ​metalbar or a ​tree, on which you can ​sit and ​movebackwards and ​forwards

swing noun (BE EXCITING)

go with a swing UK informal If an ​event, ​especially a ​party, goes with a swing, it is very ​exciting and ​successful: The Festival always goes with a swing.

swing noun (MUSIC)

[U] a ​type of ​dancemusic that was ​popular in the 1930s and 40s
(Definition of swing from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"swing" in American English

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swingverb

 us   /swɪŋ/ (past tense and past participle swung  /swʌŋ/ )

swing verb (MOVE SIDEWAYS)

[I/T] to move ​easily to one ​direction and then to the other from a ​fixedpoint, or to ​cause something to move this way: [I] He ​hungupside down and swung back and ​forth. [I] The ​heavydoor swung ​open. [T] Campanella ​knew how to swing a ​bat. [T] He swung the ​car into the ​garage.

swing verb (CHANGE)

[I] to ​change from one ​condition or ​attitude to another: The ​company swung from ​recordprofits last ​year to ​hugelosses this ​year.

swing verb (BE EXCITING)

[I] dated slang to be ​exciting, ​enjoyable, and ​active

swing verb (ARRANGE)

[T] infml to ​arrange to ​obtain or ​achieve something: The ​kids need new ​clothes, and I don’t ​see how I can swing it.

swingnoun

 us   /swɪŋ/

swing noun (MUSIC)

[U] a ​form of ​jazzmusic that was ​popular esp. in the 1930s and 1940s

swing noun (CHANGE)

[C] a usually ​suddenchange: He’s very ​creative but ​prone to ​mood swings.

swing noun (SIDEWAYS MOVEMENT)

[C] a swinging ​movement: Scott took a ​big swing at the ​ball and ​missed. [C] A swing is also an ​attempt to ​hit someone: This ​guy took a swing at me. [C] A swing is also a ​seat that moves ​backward and ​forward and ​hangs from ​ropes or ​chains. [C] A swing can also be a ​brieftrip: Ed took a 10-day swing through France.
(Definition of swing from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"swing" in Business English

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swingverb

uk   us   /swɪŋ/ (swung, swung)
[I or T] to ​change, or make a ​situation, ​price, ​opinion, etc. ​change in a noticeable way: swing into profit/deficit The ​internetcompany swung into ​profit for the first ​time since its ​start-up. swing from sth to sth The ​group swung from ​losses of 0.8p to ​earnings of 2.9p a ​share. The ​war was the biggest ​issue threatening to swing ​voters.
[T] to ​achieve the ​result you want, especially by successfully persuading someone of something: The ​bidder was ​presented with a ​list of ​addedbenefits that would ​help swing the ​deal in their favour.

swingnoun [C]

uk   us   /swɪŋ/
a ​big and sudden ​change in a ​situation, ​price, ​opinion, etc.: Coffee ​futures once again ​staged a huge ​price swing with ​uncertainty over ​exportcontrols.a swing into the red/black He also announced a swing into the ​black in the ​year to February.a swing towards/against sb/sth Evidence of the swing towards ​short-termtemporaryemployment comes in a ​survey showing ​recorddemand for ​temporarystaff.
in full swing happening at the ​highestlevel of ​activity: The ​reportconfirms that the ​economicrecovery is in ​full swing.
See also
(Definition of swing from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“swing” in Business English

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