tab Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “tab” in the English Dictionary

"tab" in British English

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tabnoun [C]

uk   us   /tæb/

tab noun [C] (SMALL OBJECT)

a ​smallpiece of ​paper, ​metal, etc. that is ​attached to something ​larger and is used for giving ​information, ​fastening, ​opening, etc.: Make a ​filefolder for these ​documents and write "​finance" on the tab. Insert Tab A into Slot A and ​glue, before ​standing the ​modelupright. US (UK ringpull) the ​smallpiece of ​metal, often ​joined to a ​ring, that is ​pulled off or ​pushed into the ​top of a can (= ​metaldrinkcontainer) to ​open it Northern English a ​cigarette (also tab of acid) informal a ​smallpiece of ​papercontaining the ​drug LSD

tab noun [C] (COMPUTER)

a ​smallsymbol on a ​computerscreen or ​website that ​allows you to ​open different ​documents or ​pages: Move between ​pages by ​clicking on the tabs at the ​top of the ​screen. a ​fixedposition on a ​line of ​text that can be ​reached by ​pressing the tab ​key on a ​keyboard

tab noun [C] (BILL)

the tab informal the ​totalmoneycharged in a ​restaurant or ​hotel for ​food, ​drinks, etc.: He ​kindlyoffered to pick up the tab (= ​pay).
(Definition of tab from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"tab" in American English

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tabnoun [C]

 us   /tæb/

tab noun [C] (SMALL PIECE)

a ​smallpiece of ​material on a ​box, can, or ​container that is ​pulled to ​open it A tab is also a ​smallpiece of ​paper or ​plasticattached to a ​paper or ​file so it can be ​foundeasily.

tab noun [C] (AMOUNT CHARGED)

an ​amountcharged for a ​service or for a ​meal in a ​restaurant: He ​offered to ​pick up the tab for ​lunch (= ​pay for it).
(Definition of tab from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"tab" in Business English

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tabnoun [C]

uk   us   /tæb/
a ​smallpiece of ​paper, metal, or cloth that is ​attached to the ​edge of something: The metal tabs at one end are where the ​wires fasten.
IT, INTERNET a ​smallsymbol on a ​website that gives you ​information about the different ​pages you can ​open on that ​website: Move between ​pages by ​clicking on the tabs at the ​top of the ​screen.
(also tab stop) IT a ​fixedposition on a ​line of ​text that you are writing on a ​computer, etc. that can be ​reached by ​pressing the tab ​key
informal the ​amount of ​money that is ​charged for something: The ​committee will ​reimburse the ​state $70,000 of the $105,000 tab for a recent ​trademission to Ireland. The tab to ​clean up the mess caused by the ​oil spill has already ​hit $9 million.pick up the tab (for sth) The ​statepicks up the ​healthcare tab for many low-income ​clients.pay the tab (for sth) Pharmaceutical ​companiespay most of the tab for the ​trials.
a ​record of what you have ​ordered or used but not yet ​paid for, especially in a ​bar or ​restaurant: put sth on the/your tab Just put it on the tab, please.on sb's tab I ​ordered drinks for everyone, ​even though this was all going on my tab. They were put up in ​hotels on the state's tab.

tabverb [T, usually passive]

uk   us   /tæb/
to ​think or say that someone or something should have a particular ​job or use: tab sb to do sth He was tabbed to ​restore glory and dignity to USA Basketball.tab sb as sth The ​CEOunofficially tabbed him as his ​successor.tab sb/sth for sth She was tabbed for a ​seat on the Board.
to put tabs on something: tab sth with sth There was a ​stack of mail-order ​catalogues tabbed with ​stickylabels.
(Definition of tab from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“tab” in Business English

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