table Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “table” in the English Dictionary

"table" in British English

See all translations

tablenoun

uk   us   /ˈteɪ.bl̩/

table noun (FURNITURE)

A1 [C] a ​flatsurface, usually ​supported by four ​legs, used for putting things on [+ sing/pl verb] the ​peoplesitting at a table: There was a really ​noisy table behind us ​celebrating someone's ​birthday. [C] Indian English a table that you ​work at in an ​office
See also
set the table B1 (UK also lay the table) to put a ​cloth, ​knives, and ​forks, etc. on the table in ​preparation for a ​meal: Could you set the table forlunch, ​please?
More examples

table noun (INFORMATION)

B1 [C] an ​arrangement of ​facts and ​numbers in ​rows or ​blocks, ​especially in ​printedmaterial [C] a multiplication table table of contents a ​list of the ​information that is ​contained in a ​book
More examples

tableverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈteɪ.bl̩/
UK to ​suggest something for ​discussion: An ​amendment to the ​proposal was tabled by ​Mrs James. US to ​delaydiscussion of a ​subject: The ​suggestion was tabled for ​discussion at a ​laterdate.
(Definition of table from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"table" in American English

See all translations

tablenoun [C]

 us   /ˈteɪ·bəl/

table noun [C] (FURNITURE)

a ​piece of ​furniture that has a ​flattopsupported by ​legs: We ​ateourmealssitting around a ​largediningroom table. The table also ​means all the ​people at a table: The ​whole table had a very good ​time.

table noun [C] (INFORMATION)

an ​arrangement of ​facts and ​numbers, usually in ​rows on a ​page, that makes ​informationeasy to ​understandtable of contents A table of ​contents is a ​list of what is in a ​book.

tableverb [T]

 us   /ˈteɪ·bəl/

table verb [T] (NOT DISCUSS)

to ​leave something for ​discussion or ​consideration at a ​latertime: We’ll have to table these last two ​items until ​our next ​meeting.
(Definition of table from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"table" in Business English

See all translations

tablenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈteɪbl/
GRAPHS & CHARTS an ​arrangement of facts or ​numbers in rows or ​columns, especially in ​printedmaterial, on ​computerscreens, etc.: The table can ​help you ​evaluate the ​potentialrisks of ​investing in the Fund. Building ​societiesdominate the best-value tables for ​mortgages. This table ​representsexportsales.
MEETINGS a ​place or ​opportunity for ​people to ​meet and discuss something: When they get to the bargaining table, there will be a fight over ​unionmembership. In countries where women are denied a ​seat at the table, ​democracy remains a hollow promise.
off the table no ​longer being considered: A ​dividendpayment this ​year is definitely off the table.
on the table having been ​offered or suggested so that it can be considered: Management said that there were important new ​benefits on the table. The ​deal appears to be still on the table. US not going to be discussed until later: If you have an important matter to ​raise, don't leave it on the table.

tableverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈteɪbl/ MEETINGS
UK to suggest or ​offer something for discussion: table an offer/bid/proposal The ​company has been looking for a ​buyer for several months but so far no ​offer has been tabled.table a motion/amendment/resolution MPs tabled 118 last ​minuteamendments.
US to ​leave a ​subject or ​idea to be discussed later: The ​motion has been tabled. I ​propose tabling this for the ​time being.
(Definition of table from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of table?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“table” in Business English

Word of the Day

forage

to go from place to place searching, especially for food

Word of the Day

Meerkat meme
Meerkat meme
by Colin McIntosh,
September 03, 2015
Meerkats are not new to popular culture (they appear in the folk tales of the San people of the Kalahari), but their arrival in the public’s consciousness, at least in the UK and the US, is a relatively recent phenomenon. Meerkats are small, sociable Southern African mammals that live in large family

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More