table Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “table” in the English Dictionary

"table" in British English

See all translations

tablenoun

uk   /ˈteɪ.bəl/ us   /ˈteɪ.bəl/
  • table noun (FURNITURE)

A1 [C] a flat surface, usually supported by four legs, used for putting things on
[+ sing/pl verb] the people sitting at a table: There was a really noisy table behind us celebrating someone's birthday.
[C] Indian English a table that you work at in an office
See also
set the table
B1 UK also lay the table to put a cloth, knives, and forks, etc. on the table in preparation for a meal: Could you set the table for lunch, please?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

tableverb [T]

uk   /ˈteɪ.bəl/ us   /ˈteɪ.bəl/
(Definition of table from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"table" in American English

See all translations

tablenoun [C]

us   /ˈteɪ·bəl/
  • table noun [C] (FURNITURE)

a piece of furniture that has a flat top supported by legs: We ate our meals sitting around a large dining room table.
The table also means all the people at a table: The whole table had a very good time.
  • table noun [C] (INFORMATION)

an arrangement of facts and numbers, usually in rows on a page, that makes information easy to understand
table of contents
A table of contents is a list of what is in a book.

tableverb [T]

us   /ˈteɪ·bəl/
  • table verb [T] (NOT DISCUSS)

to leave something for discussion or consideration at a later time: We’ll have to table these last two items until our next meeting.
(Definition of table from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"table" in Business English

See all translations

tablenoun [C]

uk   /ˈteɪbl/ us  
GRAPHS & CHARTS an arrangement of facts or numbers in rows or columns, especially in printed material, on computer screens, etc.: The table can help you evaluate the potential risks of investing in the Fund. Building societies dominate the best-value tables for mortgages. This table represents export sales.
MEETINGS a place or opportunity for people to meet and discuss something: When they get to the bargaining table, there will be a fight over union membership. In countries where women are denied a seat at the table, democracy remains a hollow promise.
off the table
no longer being considered: A dividend payment this year is definitely off the table.
on the table
having been offered or suggested so that it can be considered: Management said that there were important new benefits on the table. The deal appears to be still on the table.
US not going to be discussed until later: If you have an important matter to raise, don't leave it on the table.

tableverb [T]

uk   /ˈteɪbl/ us   MEETINGS
UK to suggest or offer something for discussion: table an offer/bid/proposal The company has been looking for a buyer for several months but so far no offer has been tabled.table a motion/amendment/resolution MPs tabled 118 last minute amendments.
US to leave a subject or idea to be discussed later: The motion has been tabled. I propose tabling this for the time being.
(Definition of table from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of table?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“table” in Business English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

Read More 

Word of the Day

pollution

damage caused to water, air, etc. by harmful substances or waste

Word of the Day

decision fatigue noun
decision fatigue noun
May 30, 2016
a decreased ability to make decisions as a result of having too many decisions to make Our brains have a finite number of decisions they can make before they get depleted and become less discerning – so this is called decision fatigue.

Read More