tag Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “tag” in the English Dictionary

"tag" in British English

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tagnoun

uk   us   /tæɡ/

tag noun (SMALL PART)

[C] a ​smallpiece of ​paper, ​cloth, or ​metal, on which there is ​information, ​tied or ​stuck onto something ​larger: a price tag

tag noun (GAME)

[U] a ​gameplayed by two or more ​children in which one ​childchases the ​others and ​tries to ​touch one of them. This ​child then ​becomes the one who does the ​chasing.

tag noun (GRAMMAR)

[C] specialized language a phrase such as "he is" or "isn't it?", ​added on to a ​sentence for ​emphasis, or to ​turn it into a ​question, usually to get ​agreement or to ​checkinformation

tag noun (MARK)

[C] a ​type of graffiti (= words and ​picturesdrawn in ​publicplaces on ​walls, etc.) that ​shows who has ​drawn it and that ​represents a signature : The tag is the most ​commonlyseengraffiti in any ​urban setting.

tagverb [T]

uk   us   /tæɡ/ (-gg-)

tag verb [T] (SMALL PART)

to put a tag on something

tag verb [T] (COMPUTING)

specialized computing to ​markcomputerinformation to be ​processed in a ​particular way
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of tag from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"tag" in American English

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tagnoun

 us   /tæɡ/

tag noun (SIGN)

[C] a ​smallpiece of ​paper, ​cloth, or ​metalattached to an ​item and ​containinginformation about it: Did you ​check the ​price tag on that ​sweater?

tag noun (GAME)

[U] a ​game for ​children in which one ​childchases the ​others and ​tries to ​touch one of them, who then is the one who ​chases the ​children

tagverb [T]

 us   /tæɡ/ (-gg-)

tag verb [T] (GAME)

to ​touch someone in the ​game of tag: I tagged you, now you’re it!

tag verb [T] (ATTACH SIGN)

to put a tag on something: The ​items are tagged and ​stacked on ​shelves.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of tag from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"tag" in Business English

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tagnoun [C]

uk   us   /tæɡ/
a ​smallpiece of ​paper, ​plastic, cloth, etc. ​attached to something that ​shows some ​information about it: Many of the bibs have a tag sewn into the lining that contains the UPC ​number. Valuable ​pieces are ​marked with a tag describing the item's age and pedigree. The ​clerkswearblack shirts and name tags.
(also smart tag) COMMERCE a ​smallelectronicobject that is ​attached to a ​product in ​order to give its ​position, or to ​stoppeople from ​stealing it: Track your ​deliveriesinventories with ​smart tags. In ​agriculture, tags are used to ​tracklivestock.
IT a ​series of ​letters, ​numbers, or ​symbols before or after a ​piece of ​electronicdata that tells the ​computer how to ​treat it: The tag is a ​link that ​takes you to a web ​page. To put anything complicated in a web ​page you have to put it in tags.
See also

tagverb [T]

uk   us   /tæɡ/ (-gg-)
to put a tag on something: The ​legalstaff are being ​required to ​print, tag and ​collate the ​documents themselves. Ranch ​hands will tag and ​track these cattle throughout the two ​years before they ​reach the ​packingplant.tag sth with sth Each ​item is tagged with a ​price and where to ​buy it.
IT to ​markelectronicdata with a ​series of ​letters or ​numbers: tag sth with sth Each ​download is tagged with an ​icon that ​identifies the ​type of ​file.
(Definition of tag from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“tag” in Business English

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