Meaning of “take sth up” in the English Dictionary

"take sth up" in British English

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take sth up

phrasal verb with take uk /teɪk/ us /teɪk/ verb took, taken

(START)

B1 to start doing a particular job or activity:

He's taken up the position of supervisor.
[ + -ing verb ] Have you ever thought of taking up acting?
Patti took up (= continued) the story where Sue had left off.
take up office

UK US take office to start an official job:

The minister took up office in December.

More examples

(DISCUSS)

to discuss something or deal with something:

The school took the matter up with the police.
UK I'd like to take you up on your sales figures for June.
UK A leading law firm took up his case.

(CLOTHING)

to make a piece of clothing, such as a skirt or trousers, shorter

(Definition of “take sth up” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"take sth up" in Business English

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take sth up

phrasal verb with take uk /teɪk/ us verb [ T ] took, taken

to fill an amount of space or time:

Getting his business started has taken up all his time.

to start doing a new job or activity:

She takes up her new post on December 1.

to accept something:

To take up this offer, you must apply in writing by end March 2012.
take sb up on sth I'm happy to take him up on his challenge.

to discuss or deal with something in a formal way:

take sth up with sb If you have a problem, you should take it up with the manager.
I took the matter up with the bank.

(Definition of “take sth up” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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