talk Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “talk” in the English Dictionary

"talk" in British English

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talkverb [I]

uk   /tɔːk/  us   /tɑːk/
  • talk verb [I] (SAY WORDS)

A1 to say words ​aloud; to ​speak to someone: We were just talking about Gareth's new ​girlfriend. My little ​girl has just ​started to talk. She talks to her ​mother on the ​phone every ​week.

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  • talk verb [I] (DISCUSS)

B2 to ​discuss something with someone, often to ​try to ​find a ​solution to a ​disagreement: The two ​sides have ​agreed to talk.
talk business, politics, etc.
C1 to ​discuss a ​particularsubject: Whenever they're together, they talk ​politics.
  • talk verb [I] (LECTURE)

B2 to give a ​lecture on a ​subject: The next ​speaker will be talking about ​endangeredinsects.

talknoun

uk   /tɔːk/  us   /tɑːk/
B1 [C] a ​conversation between two ​people, often about a ​particularsubject: I ​asked him to have a talk with his ​mother about his ​plan.
B2 [C] a ​speech given to a ​group of ​people to ​teach or ​tell them about a ​particularsubject: He gave a talk about/on his ​visit to Malaysia.
talks C2 [plural]
serious and ​formaldiscussions on an ​importantsubject, usually ​intended to ​producedecisions or agreements: Talks were held in Madrid about the ​fuelcrisis.
C2 [U] the ​action of talking about what might ​happen or be ​true, or the ​subjectpeople are talking about: Talk won't get us ​anywhere. The talk/Her talk was all about the ​wedding.

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(Definition of talk from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"talk" in American English

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talkverb [I/T]

 us   /tɔk/

talknoun [C/U]

 us   /tɔk/
  • talk noun [C/U] (SAY WORDS)

a ​conversation between two ​people, often about a ​particularsubject; the ​act of talking: [U] Talk won’t get us ​anywhere. [C] I had a talk with my ​boss. [C] Sarah gave a talk (= a ​speech before a ​group of ​people) on ​skyscrapers. [U] I’ve ​heard talk of a ​layoff (= ​unofficialinformation about it).
Talks are ​officialdiscussions between ​organizations or ​countries: [C] Contract talks between the ​airline and the ​unionbegan today.
(Definition of talk from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"talk" in Business English

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talkverb [I]

uk   us   /tɔːk/
to say things or speak to someone: talk about/of sth In Tokyo ​markets, the only thing ​people want to talk about is the ​budget problem.talk to/with sb I need to talk to the Sales Manager directly. She was talking on the ​phone to her ​co-worker.
talk business/politics, etc.
to discuss a particular ​subject: At the dinner ​table, everyone was talking ​interestratehikes and ​unemploymentnumbers.
be talking sth informal
used to emphasize that you are referring to something serious or important, a large ​amount of ​money, etc.: We're talking ​bigmoney here - £200 an hour. How ​long - are we talking five ​years or are we talking 30 ​years?
talk shop
to talk about ​work with ​people you ​work with when you are not at ​work: I hate those ​officeparties where everyone talks ​shop.
talk the talk informal
to be able to speak with the ​confidence and ​knowledge of someone who knows a lot about a particular ​subject: He can certainly talk the talk, but will he get the ​deal done?
talk turkey US informal
to discuss something in a ​direct way without ​avoiding difficult ​issues: Few politicians are ​willing to talk turkey about ​immigration.

talknoun

uk   us   /tɔːk/
[C] an occasion when someone speaks to a ​group of ​people about a particular ​subject: A speaker is coming in to give a talk to the ​salesteam.a talk about/on sth We listened to a talk about ​resources in the ​localeconomy.
talks [plural]
GOVERNMENT, MANAGEMENT, HR serious and ​formal discussions on an important ​subject usually intended to ​produce decisions or ​agreements: contract/​merger/​takeover talks The latest round of talksended today.begin/have/hold talks We ​held talks with the ​union about ​payincreases.in talks The two ​companies are in talks about a ​merger.talks about sth The ​studiobroke off talks about a movie ​distributiondeal.talks between sb Talks between the two ​nations have resulted in a new ​tradedeal.
[U] things ​people are saying about what might ​happen or be ​true: talk of sth She ​dismissed the talk of her ​resignation as nonsense. There has been talk of ​closing some ​regionaloffices.
See also
(Definition of talk from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“talk” in American English

“talk” in Business English

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