team Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “team” in the English Dictionary

"team" in British English

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teamnoun [C, + sing/pl verb]

uk   us   /tiːm/
A2 a ​number of ​people or ​animals who do something together as a ​group: a ​basketball/​hockey/​netball team a team ofinvestigators used in a ​number of ​phrases that refer to ​peopleworking together as a ​group in ​order to ​achieve something: It was a ​real team effort - everyone ​contributed something to the ​success of the ​project.
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teamverb

uk   us   /tiːm/
to ​act together to ​achieve something: Lang teamed with Draper to ​develop the ​vaccine.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of team from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"team" in American English

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teamnoun [C]

 us   /tim/
a ​number of ​people who ​act together as a ​group, either in a ​sport or in ​order to ​achieve something: a ​baseball/​basketball/​football team the ​legal/​medical team My ​favorite team is the New York Giants. A team is also two or more ​horses or other ​animalsworking together to ​pull a ​load: a team of ​oxen

teamverb [I]

 us   /tim/
to ​act together to ​achieve something: Lang teamed with Draper to ​develop the ​vaccine. Williamson and Erving teamed to give the Nets another ​championship.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of team from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"team" in Business English

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teamnoun [C]

uk   us   /tiːm/
HR, WORKPLACE a ​group of ​people who ​work together on a particular ​activity, ​project, etc.: When I came back from ​holiday we had a new team in ​charge.head/lead/manage a team She ​led a team ​developing a new ​marketinginitiative. Every member of the team has an important ​contribution to make. the management/​finance/​marketing team We need to ​consult our legal team on this. a team of ​lawyers/​salespeople/​experts
a ​number of sports ​players who ​play together under a particular ​name: a football/baseball/basketball team Her ​ambition was to ​play for her national team.
work as a team to ​work together in ​order to ​achieve a ​sharedaim, rather than ​trying to ​achieve things just for yourself or ​working against others: Working as a team will ​enable us to ​achieve things we never could alone.

teamverb [I]

uk   us   /tiːm/ (also team up) HR, WORKPLACE
to get together with another ​person, ​group, or ​organization to do a ​job: team (up) with sb Some ​smallcommunity hospitals are looking to team up with bigger ​healthcareproviders.team (up) with sb to do sth The ​shop is teaming with ​high-endmanufacturers to ​offerexclusiveproducts to its ​customers.team up to do sth The two ​companies have teamed up to ​provide a new ​class of ​multimediaservices.
(Definition of team from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“team” in Business English

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