there Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “there” in the English Dictionary

"there" in British English

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thereadverb

uk   /ðeər/  us   /ðer/
  • there adverb (PLACE)

A1 (to, at, or in) that place: Put the chair there. The museum is closed today. We'll go there tomorrow. There's that book you were looking for. I'll have to stop you there - we've run out of time. I left the boxes over/out/under there.
get there
A1 to arrive somewhere: We'll never get there in time.
B2 informal to succeed: Try again - you'll get there in the end.

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  • there adverb (INTRODUCING SUBJECT)

A1 used to introduce the subject of a sentence, especially before the verbs be, seem, and appear: There's someone on the phone for you. There's no doubt who is the best candidate. I took out my wallet but there was no money in it. By the time I got back, there was no food left. There appeared/seemed to be a problem with finding a date for the meeting.not standard There's (= there are) lives at stake and we can't afford to take any risks.
literary used to begin some children's stories written in a traditional style: There once was/lived a poor widow who had a beautiful daughter.

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Grammar

thereexclamation

uk   /ðeər/  us   /ðer/
(Definition of there from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"there" in American English

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thereadverb [not gradable]

 us   /ðeər/
in, at, or to that place: Put the chair there. The museum was closed today, so we’ll go there tomorrow.

therepronoun

 us   /ðeər/
  • there pronoun (INTRODUCING A SENTENCE)

used to introduce sentences, esp. before the verbs be, seem, and appear: There’s someone on the phone for you. There will be plenty of time to pack tomorrow.
(Definition of there from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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shade

to prevent direct light from shining on something

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