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Meaning of “through” in the English Dictionary

"through" in British English

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throughpreposition, adverb

uk   /θruː/  us   /θruː/
  • through preposition, adverb (PLACE)

A2 (also US not standard thru) from one end or ​side of something to the other: They ​walkedslowly through the ​woods. The ​boywaded through the ​water to ​reach his ​boat. He ​struggled through the ​crowd till he ​reached the ​front. How ​long the ​journeytakes will ​depend on how ​long it ​takes to get through the ​traffic. Her words ​keptrunning through my ​mind/​head (= I ​kepthearing her words in my ​imagination). We ​drove through the ​tunnel. I ​saw him ​drive through a ​redlight (= he did not ​stop at the ​redtrafficlight). I'll put you through (= ​connect you by ​phone) (to the ​salesdepartment).

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  • through preposition, adverb (TIME)

B1 from the ​beginning to the end of a ​period of ​time: It ​rained all/​right through ​June and into the first ​half of ​July. We ​sat through two of the ​speeches and then ​left. She had just enough ​energy to get through the ​day.US She ​worksMonday through ​Thursday (= from ​Monday to ​Thursday).

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throughpreposition

uk   /θruː/  us   /θruː/
  • through preposition (RESULT)

B1 as a ​result of: The ​companylost the ​order through ​productiondelays.

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  • through preposition (USING)

B1 by; using: I got my ​car through my ​brother who ​works in a ​garage. We ​sold the ​bike through ​advertising in the ​localpaper.

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throughadjective

uk   /θruː/  us   /θruː/
  • through adjective (FINISHED)

having ​finished using or doing something: I've got some ​work to do but I should be through in an ​hour if you can ​wait. Are you through with that ​atlas?
  • through adjective (DIRECT)

C1 [only before noun] A through ​train or ​bus goes all the way from one ​place to another ​place without the ​passenger having to ​changetrains or ​buses.
(Definition of through from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"through" in American English

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throughadjective, adverb [not gradable]

 us   /θru/
from one ​side or end to the other, from one ​part to another, or from the ​beginning to the end: We ​drove through the ​tunnel We took a ​shortcut through the ​woods. Have you ​read the ​report all the way through?
If you ​drive through a ​redlight or ​stopsign, you do not ​stop at it.
finished or ​completed: Are you through with that ​book? My ​girlfriend says we’re through (= ​ourrelationship is over).
during a ​period of ​time, esp. from the ​beginning to the end: We ​sat through two ​lectures and then ​left. She had just enough ​energy to get through the ​day. I ​workTuesdays through ​Saturdays (= each ​day during this ​period).

throughpreposition

 us   /θru/
  • through preposition (AS A RESULT)

as a ​result of: Bob ​learned of the ​contract through a ​story in the ​newspaper.
  • through preposition (USING)

by; using: Schools are financed through ​propertytaxes.
(Definition of through from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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