tighten Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “tighten” in the English Dictionary

"tighten" in British English

See all translations

tightenverb [I or T]

uk   /ˈtaɪ.tən/ us   /ˈtaɪ.tən/
B2 to become tighter or to make something become tighter, firmer, or less easy to move: Tighten the straps so they don't rub. As he struggled, the ropes tightened even more.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

(Definition of tighten from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"tighten" in American English

See all translations

tightenverb

us   /ˈtɑɪt·ən/
  • tighten verb (CONTROL)

[T] to strongly control something: Security was tightened at US embassies around the world. The government moved to tighten the rules on toxic substances in the air. [M] Our team will have to tighten up its defense if we want to win.
  • tighten verb (LIMIT)

[T] to make something less easily available: The government plans to tighten credit and slow the growth of the money supply.
  • tighten verb (MAKE FIRMER)

[I/T] to make something tighter, firmer, or less easy to move: [T] You’ve got to tighten the laces of your ice skates. [I] His arms tightened around her.
(Definition of tighten from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"tighten" in Business English

See all translations

tightenverb [I or T]

uk   /ˈtaɪtən/ us  
also tighten up GOVERNMENT, LAW to make a rule, system, or law stronger and more difficult to ignore: tighten controls/rules/regulation There were renewed calls to tighten controls on imported products.
ECONOMICS, FINANCE limiting the amount of money that people and companies are able to borrow or spend, for example, by increasing interest rates: Central banks were expected to respond by tightening monetary policy.
ECONOMICS, COMMERCE if a market tightens, there becomes less of something available than is wanted or needed: The global market for nurses is tightening.
tighten your belt
to spend less money than usual for a period of time because you do not have as much money: The major supermarkets have started a price war as customers tighten their belts.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of tighten from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of tighten?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“tighten” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

Read More 

Word of the Day

environment

the air, water, and land in or on which people, animals, and plants live

Word of the Day

decision fatigue noun
decision fatigue noun
May 30, 2016
a decreased ability to make decisions as a result of having too many decisions to make Our brains have a finite number of decisions they can make before they get depleted and become less discerning – so this is called decision fatigue.

Read More