Meaning of “tired” in the English Dictionary

"tired" in British English

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uk /taɪəd/ us /taɪrd/

tired adjective (NEEDING REST)

A1 in need of rest or sleep:

I was so tired when I got home from work last night that I had a quick nap.
My legs are tired.
She spoke in a tired voice.

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tired adjective (NOT INTERESTING)

disapproving used to describe people, ideas, or subjects that are not interesting because they are very familiar:

It's always the same tired old faces at these meetings.
be tired of sth/sb

B1 to be bored with an activity or person:

I'm so tired of doing the same job, day after day.
Don't you get tired of arguing all the time?
I'm sick and tired of you telling me what to do all the time.
adverb uk /ˈtaɪə us /ˈtaɪ

feeling or showing a need to rest or sleep

noun [ U ] uk /ˈtaɪəd.nəs/ us /ˈtaɪrd.nəs/


He said that it was tiredness that led him to make the mistake.
I was overtaken by a sudden wave of tiredness.

(Definition of “tired” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"tired" in American English

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tiredadjective [ not gradable ]

us /tɑɪərd/

in need of rest or sleep:

I had been up all night with the baby and was really tired.
tired of

If you are tired of something, you are bored or annoyed by it:

I’m tired of cleaning up after you.

(Definition of “tired” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)