title Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “title” in the English Dictionary

"title" in British English

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titlenoun

uk   /ˈtaɪ.tl̩/  us   /-t̬l̩/
  • title noun (NAME)

B1 [C] the ​name of a ​film, ​book, ​painting, ​piece of ​music, etc.: The title of Evelyn Waugh's first ​novel was "Decline and Fall". And this next ​record is the title track from the ​album ".The ​Red Shoes". (= the ​piece of ​music and the ​record are both called "The ​Red Shoes"). titles [plural] (also credits) the ​information given at the end or ​beginning of a ​film or ​televisionprogramme, ​stating the ​names of the ​people who ​acted in it or were ​involved in ​itsproduction [C] specialized publishing a ​book: Last ​year we ​published over a hundred new titles.

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  • title noun (PERSON)

[C] a word that is used before someone's ​name, ​statingtheirsocialrank, ​qualifications, ​position in an ​organization, ​sex, etc.: What's her title - is she Professor or Doctor? He will ​retain the ​honorary title of non-executive ​chairman. What's ​your job title now - are you ​managingdirector?

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  • title noun (SPORTS PRIZE)

C2 [C] the ​position you get by ​beating all other ​competitors in a ​sportscompetition: Joe Louis ​won the ​heavyweightboxing title in 1937.

titleverb [T]

uk   /ˈtaɪ.tl̩/  us   /-t̬l̩/
to give a title to a ​book, ​movie, ​play, ​song, or ​work of ​art: He titled his ​autobiography "Beneath the Underdog".
(Definition of title from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"title" in American English

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titlenoun

 us   /ˈtɑɪ·t̬əl/
  • title noun (NAME)

[C] the ​name of a ​book, ​movie, ​play, ​song, or ​work of ​art: The ​book is an ​index to ​song titles.
  • title noun (RANK)

[C] a word or phrase that ​shows a person’s ​rank or ​job: Her ​job title is ​director of ​humanresources.
  • title noun (SPORTS PRIZE)

[C] a ​prize or ​publicstatementshowing that someone is the ​best in a ​particularsport or ​competition: She ​won her third ​straight title in ​speedskating.
  • title noun (LEGAL RIGHT)

[U] specialized the ​legalright to own something, esp. a ​piece of ​land or a ​building: That little ​paper is ​your title to the ​car, so don’t ​lose it.

titleverb [T]

 us   /ˈtɑɪ·t̬əl/
to give a title to a ​book, ​movie, ​play, ​song, or ​work of ​art: He titled his ​autobiography "Beneath the Underdog."
(Definition of title from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"title" in Business English

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titlenoun

uk   us   /ˈtaɪtl/
[C] the ​name of a ​book, film, ​article, ​piece of music, etc.: The title of the film was "An Unreasonable Man".with/under a title The ​report is about to be ​published under the title Choosing Futures.
[C] a ​book with a particular title that is ​produced by a publisher: The ​publishingcompany has just 30 titles on its ​currentlist.
[C] a word that is sometimes used in ​front of someone's ​name to show their ​position: Use the pull-down ​menu to ​enter your title (Mr, Ms, Mrs, Dr, etc.).
[C] HR the ​name of a particular ​job in an ​organization: I have a new title: I'm Director of HR and Training.keep/give up/relinquish a title He gave up the title of ​CEO four ​years ago. I ​think his title is Chief of Staff.
See also
[S] a ​position that a ​person or ​team gets by ​beating all the others in a sports ​competition: hold/win/defend a title The champion could not ​defend her title ​following knee surgery. the Premiership/World Series/Grand Slam title
[C or U] LAW, PROPERTY the ​legalright to own a ​building or a ​piece of ​land: have/hold (the) title He did not have title and therefore could not ​transfer the ​property to anyone else. Who ​holds the title to the ​property?
(Definition of title from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“title” in Business English

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