toll Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “toll” in the English Dictionary

"toll" in British English

See all translations

tollnoun

uk   /təʊl/  us   /toʊl/

toll noun (CHARGE)

C1 [C] a ​smallamount of ​money that you have to ​pay to use a ​road, ​cross a ​bridge, etc.: Tolls are now ​collectedelectronically on most ​motorways. [C] US the ​money a long-distancephonecallcosts: Is Bayonne a toll call (= a more ​expensivephonecall) from New York?
More examples

toll noun (SUFFERING)

C2 [U] suffering, ​deaths, or ​damage: Independent ​sources say that the death toll from the ​earthquakeruns into thousands.

tollverb [I or T]

uk   /təʊl/  us   /toʊl/
to (​cause a ​largebell to) ​ringslowly and ​repeatedly: In the ​distance, a ​churchbell tolled the ​hour (= ​showed the ​time by ​ringing).
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"toll" in American English

See all translations

tollnoun

 us   /toʊl/

toll noun (MONEY)

[C] an ​amount of ​money that you have to ​pay to ​travel along some ​mainroads, to cross ​bridges, etc., or to make ​telephonecalls over ​longdistances: They’re ​raising the ​bridge toll to $5.00. The ​number you ​dialed is a toll ​call – ​pleasedeposit an ​additional fifty ​cents.

toll noun (SUFFERING)

[U] a high ​degree of ​suffering or ​damage: In ​addition to the ​physicaldestruction caused by the ​flooding, the ​emotional toll on ​itsvictims was ​immense.

tollverb [I/T]

 us   /toʊl/

toll verb [I/T] (RING)

(of a ​largebell) to ​ringslowly and ​repeatedly, or to ​cause a ​largebell to ​ring in this way: [I] The ​townhallbell tolled at ​noon.
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"toll" in Business English

See all translations

tollnoun

uk   us   /təʊl/
[C] TRANSPORT an ​amount of ​money that you have to ​pay to use a road or ​bridge: Motorists in the ​regionpaid more than $11.6 million in tolls last ​year.pay/collect a toll Vehicles would be ​fitted with an ​electronictagallowingdrivers to ​pay tolls by ​creditcard, over the ​phone or ​electronically. road/​bridge/motorway tolls a toll ​bridge/highway/motorway
[C] INTERNET, COMMUNICATIONS an ​amount of ​money that you have to ​pay to use the ​internet or to visit particular ​websites: Cable ​companies must ​treat all ​onlinetraffic equally, without ​imposinghigher tolls for ​certaincontent.
[C] US COMMUNICATIONS the ​cost of a ​long-distancephonecall
[S] the ​totalnumber of ​bad things or ​amount of ​damage that ​happens as a ​result of something: The final toll of ​bankruptcies for this ​year is high. The death toll from the earthquake was over a million.financial/economic/emotional toll Layoffs ​carry a large ​human and ​financial toll.
to take its/their toll (on sth/sb) if something ​takes its toll, it causes ​damage: The ​recession is taking its toll on ​smallbusinesses. The ​building was once a ​model of its ​kind, but ​years of neglect have taken their toll. Stress can take a ​heavy toll on your ​health.
(Definition of toll from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of toll?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“toll” in Business English

Word of the Day

harvest

to pick and collect crops, or to collect plants, animals, or fish to eat

Word of the Day

In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
by Liz Walter,
September 02, 2015
Several readers have asked for information on prepositions, so I will start with a blog post that looks at an area where they are really important: travel. The first thing to remember is that we use to (and not ‘in’) after the verb go: We are going to London. I went to

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More