Meaning of “torch” in the English Dictionary

"torch" in British English

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uk /tɔːtʃ/ us /tɔːrtʃ/

B2 [ C ] UK US flashlight a small light that is held in the hand and usually gets its power from batteries:

She flashed/shone the torch into the dark room.

[ C ] a thick stick with material that burns tied to the top of it, used to give light:

literary Many buildings were put to the torch (= burned intentionally) during the riots.

[ S ] approving used as a symbol of a political movement or idea that has an important positive influence:

She promised that the party would carry the torch of progressivism into the next decade.

More examples

torchverb [ T ]

uk /tɔːtʃ/ us /tɔːrtʃ/

(Definition of “torch” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"torch" in American English

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torchnoun [ C ]

us /tɔrtʃ/

a stick that burns at one end and is held at the other end and is used esp. as a light:

Which athlete will carry the Olympic torch into the stadium?

fig. The torch is the basic responsibilities and characteristics of a group, organization, or society, esp. when someone new takes control:

After he retired, the torch passed to his daughter, who now runs the organization.

A torch is also a blowtorch.

torchverb [ T ]

us /tɔrtʃ/ infml

to burn something intentionally and usually illegally:

They torched the warehouse and ran.

(Definition of “torch” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)