trace Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “trace” in the English Dictionary

"trace" in British English

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traceverb [T]

uk   us   /treɪs/

trace verb [T] (FIND)

C1 to ​find someone or something that was ​lost: The ​police are ​trying to trace the ​mother of a ​newbornbabyfoundabandonedoutside a ​hospital. Attempts to trace the ​whereabouts of a man ​seenleaving the ​scene of the ​crime have so ​far been ​unsuccessful. Their ​missingdaughter was ​finally traced to (= ​found in) Manchester.C1 to ​find the ​origin of something: The ​phonecompany was ​unable to trace the ​call. No one has ​yet been ​able to trace the ​source of the ​rumour. to ​discover the ​causes or ​origins of something by ​examining the way in which it has ​developed: The ​outbreak of ​foodpoisoning was traced to some ​contaminatedshellfish. She has traced her ​familyhistory back to the seventeenth ​century. The ​practice of giving ​eggs at ​Easter can be traced back to (= first ​happened in)festivals in ​ancientChina. to ​describe the way in which something has ​developed: The ​film traces the ​eventsleading up to the ​Russian Revolution in 1917.
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trace verb [T] (DRAW)

to ​copy a ​drawing or ​pattern, etc. by ​drawing over ​itslines through a ​thinpiece of ​transparentpaper: Did you ​draw this ​picture yourself, or did you trace it? She ​learned to write her ​name by tracing out the ​letters. to ​draw a ​shape by ​showing the ​main or ​outerlines: The ​child was tracing ​patterns in/on the ​sand with a ​stick.

tracenoun

uk   us   /treɪs/

trace noun (SIGN/RECORD)

B2 [C or U] a ​sign that something has ​happened or ​existed: He ​attempted to ​cover up all the traces of his ​crime. When she ​moved out, she left no trace of having been there. My ​wallet has been ​missing for several ​days and I can't ​find any trace of it. He ​seems to have ​vanished without (a) trace (= no one ​knows where he is). [C] an ​act of ​findinginformation about something ​electronically, or the ​record of the ​informationfound in this way: The ​phonecompany put a trace on the ​call.
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trace noun (SLIGHT AMOUNT)

[C] a very ​slightamount: Traces ofdrugs were ​found in his ​blood. There is just a trace ofgrey in his ​hair. She ​speaksEnglish without any trace of an ​accent. There was the ​faintest trace of a ​smile on her ​lips. "How ​wonderful!" she said, without any trace ofsarcasm.
(Definition of trace from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"trace" in American English

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traceverb [T]

 us   /treɪs/

trace verb [T] (FIND)

to ​find someone or something by ​searchingcarefully: Police are ​trying to trace the ​mother of the ​abandonedbaby. The ​phonecompany was ​unable to trace the ​call (= ​find where it came from). To trace something is also to ​discoveritscause or ​origin: The ​outbreak of ​foodpoisoning was traced to ​contaminatedshellfish. They trace ​theirfamily back to the early ​settlers. To trace something is also to ​describe the way it ​developed: The ​movie traces the ​eventsleading up to the Russian ​Revolution.

trace verb [T] (DRAW)

to ​copy a ​drawing, ​pattern, etc. by ​drawingitslines on a ​thinpiece of ​paper that is ​placed over it

tracenoun [C]

 us   /treɪs/

trace noun [C] (SLIGHT AMOUNT)

a very ​slightamount or ​degree: There was a trace of a ​smile on his ​face, She ​speaksEnglish without the ​slightest trace of an ​accent.

trace noun [C] (FIND)

a ​mark or ​sign that something ​happened or ​existed: They ​found traces of a ​lostcivilization in the ​jungle. He ​vanished without a trace.
(Definition of trace from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"trace" in Business English

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traceverb [T]

uk   us   /treɪs/
to ​follow the ​movements, ​progress, or ​development of something: We traced the ​manufacturingprocess from the ​arrival of the ​rawmaterials to the ​shipment of the ​finalproduct.
to ​find someone or something: Will you trace the ​origin of these ​orders, please?
to describe the way in which something has ​developed: The ​mainaim of this ​project is to trace the ​history of the ​Keynesianrevolution.

tracenoun [C]

uk   us   /treɪs/
the ​process of ​searching for something that has been ​lost: put a trace on sth We have put a trace on your missing ​luggage.
(Definition of trace from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“trace” in Business English

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