train Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “train” in the English Dictionary

"train" in British English

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trainnoun

uk   us   /treɪn/

train noun (VEHICLE)

A1 [C] a ​railwayengineconnected tocarriages for ​carryingpeople or to ​wheeledcontainers for ​carryinggoods: a goods/​freight/​passenger train the train to/from Bristol a train journey/​station Did you come by train? She caught/took the train to Edinburgh. Hurry up, or we'll miss (= ​arrive too late for) the train.

train noun (SERIES)

train of thought/events C2 a ​series of ​connectedthoughts or ​events: What ​amazing train of ​thoughtled you from Napoleon to ​globalwarming? The ​bookdescribes the train of ​events that ​led up to the ​assassination. [C] a ​line of ​animals, ​people, or things ​moving along together: a ​wagon train a ​mule/​camel train

train noun (PART OF DRESS)

[C] the ​part of a ​longdress that ​spreads out onto the ​floor behind the ​personwearing it: an ​elaborateweddingdress with a ​long train

trainverb

uk   us   /treɪn/

train verb (PREPARE)

B1 [I or T] to ​prepare someone or yourself for a ​job, ​activity, or ​sport, by ​learningskills and/or by ​mental or ​physicalexercise: She trained as a ​pilot. [+ to infinitive] John trained to be an ​accountant. [+ to infinitive] I had to train myself to be more ​assertive at ​work. She trained hard for the ​race, sometimes ​running as much as 60 ​miles a ​week.humorous I'm ​trying to train my ​kids topick up after themselves.
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train verb (AIM)

[T usually + adv/prep] formal to ​aim or ​point a ​gun, ​camera, ​light, etc. at someone or something: With five ​gunssuddenly trained on him, he was ​understandablynervous.

train verb (DIRECT GROWTH)

[T] to ​direct the ​growth of a ​plant in a ​particulardirection by ​cutting it and ​tying it: The ​vines were trained over an ​arch, ​providingshade as well as ​fruit.
(Definition of train from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"train" in American English

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trainnoun [C]

 us   /treɪn/

train noun [C] (VEHICLE)

a ​railroadengine and the ​connected, ​wheeledcontainers it ​pulls along the ​tracks in ​carryinggoods or ​people: a ​freight/​passenger train a ​commuter train

train noun [C] (SERIES)

a ​line of ​animals, ​people, or things ​moving along together, or a ​series of ​connectedthoughts or ​events: a ​mule/​wagon train Now I’ve ​lost my train of ​thought and ​forgot what I was going to say.

train noun [C] (PART OF DRESS)

the ​part of a ​longdress that ​spreads out onto the ​floor behind

trainverb [I/T]

 us   /treɪn/

train verb [I/T] (PREPARE)

to ​prepare someone or be ​prepared for a ​job, ​activity, or ​sport by ​learningskills or by ​mental or ​physicalexercise: [I] She trained as a ​pilot. [T] He trains ​teachers to use new ​technology. [I] She trained hard for the ​race, sometimes ​running as much as 60 ​miles a ​week.
(Definition of train from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"train" in Business English

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trainverb

uk   us   /treɪn/ HR
[T] to teach someone the ​skills and ​knowledge needed for a particular ​job or ​activity: Younger ​recruits are considered easier to train. It ​takes at least six ​years to train a ​doctor.train sb to be/do sth We trained them to be ​computerspecialists.
[I] to learn the ​skills and ​knowledge needed for a particular ​job or ​activity: train as sth He trained as an ​accountant.train for sth Rebecca is training for her ​commercialtruckdrivingcertificate.train to be/do sth They were training to be ​pilots.

trainnoun [C]

uk   us   /treɪn/
a ​railwayengineconnected to a ​group of ​vehicles for ​carryingpeople or ​goods: catch/take a train He usually wakes up before dawn to ​catch a train just after 5 a.m. London is two and a half ​hours away by train. a commuter/​freight/​passenger train a train ​company/​operator/​service
(Definition of train from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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