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Meaning of “train” in the English Dictionary

"train" in British English

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trainnoun

uk   /treɪn/ us   /treɪn/
  • train noun (VEHICLE)

A1 [C] a railway engine connected tocarriages for carrying people or to wheeled containers for carrying goods: a goods/freight/passenger train the train to/from Bristol a train journey/station Did you come by train? She caught/took the train to Edinburgh. Hurry up, or we'll miss (= arrive too late for) the train.

trainverb

uk   /treɪn/ us   /treɪn/
  • train verb (PREPARE)

B1 [I or T] to prepare someone or yourself for a job, activity, or sport, by learning skills and/or by mental or physical exercise: She trained as a pilot. [+ to infinitive] John trained to be an accountant. [+ to infinitive] I had to train myself to be more assertive at work. She trained hard for the race, sometimes running as much as 60 miles a week.humorous I'm trying to train my kids to pick up after themselves.

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  • train verb (AIM)

[T usually + adv/prep] formal to aim or point a gun, camera, light, etc. at someone or something: With five guns suddenly trained on him, he was understandably nervous.
(Definition of train from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"train" in American English

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trainnoun [C]

us   /treɪn/
  • train noun [C] (VEHICLE)

a railroad engine and the connected, wheeled containers it pulls along the tracks in carrying goods or people: a freight/passenger train a commuter train
  • train noun [C] (SERIES)

a line of animals, people, or things moving along together, or a series of connected thoughts or events: a mule/wagon train Now I’ve lost my train of thought and forgot what I was going to say.
  • train noun [C] (PART OF DRESS)

the part of a long dress that spreads out onto the floor behind

trainverb [I/T]

us   /treɪn/
  • train verb [I/T] (PREPARE)

to prepare someone or be prepared for a job, activity, or sport by learning skills or by mental or physical exercise: [I] She trained as a pilot. [T] He trains teachers to use new technology. [I] She trained hard for the race, sometimes running as much as 60 miles a week.
(Definition of train from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"train" in Business English

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trainverb

uk   /treɪn/ us   HR
[T] to teach someone the skills and knowledge needed for a particular job or activity: Younger recruits are considered easier to train. It takes at least six years to train a doctor.train sb to be/do sth We trained them to be computer specialists.
[I] to learn the skills and knowledge needed for a particular job or activity: train as sth He trained as an accountant.train for sth Rebecca is training for her commercial truck driving certificate.train to be/do sth They were training to be pilots.

trainnoun [C]

uk   /treɪn/ us  
a railway engine connected to a group of vehicles for carrying people or goods: catch/take a train He usually wakes up before dawn to catch a train just after 5 a.m. London is two and a half hours away by train. a commuter/freight/passenger train a train company/operator/service
(Definition of train from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“train” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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