trance Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “trance” in the English Dictionary

"trance" in British English

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trancenoun

uk   /trɑːns/  us   /træns/
  • trance noun (MENTAL CONDITION)

[C] a ​temporarymentalcondition in which someone is not ​completelyconscious of and/or not in ​control of himself or herself: First she goes/​falls into a ​deep trance, and then the ​spiritvoicesstart to ​speak through her. When a ​hypnotist puts you in(to) a trance, you no ​longer have ​consciouscontrol of yourself. He ​satstaring out of the ​window as if in a trance.
  • trance noun (MUSIC)

[U] fast, ​electronicdancemusic with a ​regularbeat, ​keyboards, but usually no ​singing
(Definition of trance from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"trance" in American English

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trancenoun [C]

 us   /træns/
a ​mentalstate between ​sleeping and ​waking in which a ​person does not move but can ​hear and ​understand what is being said: The ​sound of the ​waveslulled me into a trance.
(Definition of trance from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “trance”
in Spanish trance…
in Vietnamese trạng thái hôn mê…
in Malaysian keadaan bersawai…
in Thai การอยู่ในภวังค์…
in French transe…
in German die Trance…
in Chinese (Simplified) 心理状态, 昏睡状态, 催眠状态…
in Turkish kendinden geçme, trans…
in Russian транс…
in Indonesian keadaan setengah sadar…
in Chinese (Traditional) 心理狀態, 昏睡狀態, 催眠狀態…
in Polish trans…
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“trance” in British English

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