transfer Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “transfer” in the English Dictionary

"transfer" in British English

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transferverb

uk   /trænsˈfɜːr/  us   /ˈtræns.fɝː/ (-rr-)
B1 [T] to ​move someone or something from one ​place, ​vehicle, ​person, or ​group to another: He has been transferred to a ​psychiatrichospital. She transferred her ​gun fromitsshoulderholster to her ​handbag. We were transferred from one ​bus into another. Police are ​investigating how £20 million was ​illegally transferred from/out of the trust's ​bankaccount. The ​aim is to transfer power/​control/​responsibility toself-governingregionalcouncils. to ​arrange for someone to ​answerphonecallsreceived on one ​telephone on another ​telephone: I'll be ​upstairs, so could you transfer my ​phonecalls up there, ​please?B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​change to a different ​job, ​team, ​place of ​work, etc., or to make someone do this: After a ​year he transferred to University College, Dublin. My ​employerwanted to transfer me to another ​department. Some very ​high-profileplayers have transferred toclubsabroad. He ​threatened to give up ​playing if his ​club didn't transfer him (= ​sell him to another ​team). [T] to make something the ​legalproperty of another ​person: She transferred the ​house to her ​daughter before she ​died.
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transferable
adjective uk   /trænsˈfɜː.rə.bl̩/  us   /-ˈfɝː.ə-/
The ​tickets were ​marked "not transferable".

transfernoun

uk   /ˈtræns.fɜːr/  us   /-fɝː/

transfer noun (MOVE/CHANGE)

B2 the ​movement of something or someone from one ​place, ​position, etc. to another: the transfer of ​information Black's transfer to the Austin ​office came as a ​shock his ​colleagues. The ​official transfer ofownership will take a few ​days to ​complete.
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transfer noun (SPORTS)

[C] a ​player who has ​moved from one ​sportsteam to another: He came to the ​team as a transfer from Tottenham.

transfer noun (TRANSPORT)

[C] transportprovided between two ​places, for ​example between an ​airport and ​hotel: The ​priceincludesflight, ​hotel and all transfers.

transfer noun (TRAVEL TICKET)

[C] US a ​ticket that ​allows a ​passenger to ​changeroutes or to ​change from one ​bus or ​train to another

transfer noun (PATTERN)

[C] a ​picture or ​pattern that can be ​attached to a ​surface by ​pressing it against the ​surface and then ​rubbing or ​heating it: The ​kidsbought transfers and ​ironed them onto ​their T-shirts.
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(Definition of transfer from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"transfer" in American English

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transferverb [I/T]

 us   /trænsˈfɜr, ˈtræns·fər/ (-rr-)
to move from one ​place, ​person, or ​position to another, or to ​cause someone or something to move: [I] She ​studied for two ​years at Smith College, then transferred to the University of Chicago. [T] Transfer ​yourweight to ​yourfrontfoot as you ​swing. When ​property is transferred to someone, ​legalownership is ​changed from one ​person to another: [T] Franklin transferred the ​car to his ​brother.
transferable
adjective  /trænsˈfɜr·ə·bəl/
Prizes are not transferable except to a ​survivingspouse.

transfernoun [C/U]

 us   /ˈtræns·fər/
a move from one ​place, ​person, or ​position to another : [C] I got my ​money through an ​electronic transfer into my ​account.
(Definition of transfer from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"transfer" in Business English

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transferverb

uk   us   /trænsˈfɜːr/ (-rr-)
[T] to ​move someone or something from one ​place to another: transfer sb/sth to sth The ​company is to transfer 1500 ​jobs to India by the end of the ​year. Anyone transferring a ​pension from one ​company to another could be ​hit by early ​exitpenalties. The ​idea is to transfer all the firm's ​operationalbusiness to the web.
[I or T] WORKPLACE to ​change to a different ​job, ​team, ​place of ​work, or ​situation, or to make someone do this: transfer to sth A ​smallnumber of ​employees will be ​offered a chance to transfer to California.transfer sb to sth The ​manager transferred him to another ​store.transfer between sth You can transfer between ​ISAproviders during the ​taxyear.
[T] BANKING, FINANCE to ​movemoney from one ​account to another: transfer sth to/into sth The ​money will be transferred into your ​bankaccount. He ​opened an ​instantaccessaccount and transferred his ​savings.
[T] IT to ​movedata from one ​computer, ​system, etc. to another: transfer sth to sth All ​forms have been transferred to ​disk.
[T] LAW to make something the ​legalproperty of another ​person: transfer sth to sb Married couples do not have to ​pay this ​tax if ​property is transferred from one to the other after death.
[T] COMMUNICATIONS to ​pass a ​phonecall from one ​phone to another: transfer sb to sb Please ​hold while I transfer you to my ​supervisor.

transfernoun

uk   us   /ˈtrænsfɜːr/
[U] the ​process of ​moving someone or something from one ​place to another: Very little of the bank's ​business will be affected by the ​parent group's transfer of ​jobs to Asia. Technical problems were delaying the ​money transfer.
[C] an occasion when someone or something ​moves from one ​place to another: Many ​merchants who prefer ​electronic transfers to ​dealing with the ​paperchecks. This ​accountrequires 14 days' ​notice for transfers out. He loved ​living there but had to ​sell because of a job transfer.
[U] LAW the ​act of making something the ​legalproperty of another ​person: You will need to ​pay a ​solicitor to ​handle the transfer of ​ownership of the ​property from the ​seller to you.
(Definition of transfer from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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