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Meaning of “tread” in the English Dictionary

"tread" in British English

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treadverb [I or T, usually + adv/prep]

uk   /tred/ us   /tred/ trod or US also treaded, trodden or US and Australian English also trod
C2 mainly UK to put your foot on something or to press something down with your foot: I kept treading on his toes when we were dancing. Yuck! Look what I've just trodden in! A load of food had been trodden into the carpet. Before the days of automation, they used to tread grapes to make wine.
literary to walk: He trod heavily and reluctantly up the stairs. I sometimes see him flash past in his sports car as I tread my weary way (= walk in a tired way) to work.
tread water
to float vertically in the water by moving the legs and the arms up and down

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treadnoun

uk   /tred/ us   /tred/
(Definition of tread from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"tread" in American English

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treadverb [I/T]

us   /tred/ past tense trod /trɑd/ , past participle trodden /ˈtrɑd·ən/ trod /trɑd/
  • tread verb [I/T] (TAKE STEP)

to put the foot down while stepping, or to step on something: [I] fig. I hope I haven’t trod on other people’s toes by saying this.

treadnoun

us   /tred/
  • tread noun (PATTERN)

[C/U] the raised pattern on a tire that holds the vehicle to the road as it moves: [U] fat tires with knobby tread
  • tread noun (STEP)

[C] the sound that someone’s feet make in walking: I heard the heavy tread of my father overhead.
[C] A tread is also the horizontal surface on which you put your foot on a step.
(Definition of tread from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“tread” in British English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
by ,
May 31, 2016
by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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