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Meaning of “treat” in the English Dictionary

"treat" in British English

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treatverb

uk   /triːt/ us   /triːt/
  • treat verb (DEAL WITH)

B2 [T usually + adv/prep] to behave towards someone or deal with something in a particular way: My parents treated us all the same when we were kids. He treated his wife very badly. It's wrong to treat animals as if they had no feelings. I treat remarks like that with the contempt that they deserve.

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  • treat verb (GIVE MEDICAL CARE)

B2 [T] to use drugs, exercises, etc. to cure a person of a disease or heal an injury: He is being treated for a rare skin disease. Western medicine tends to treat the symptoms and not the cause.

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  • treat verb (PUT ON)

[T] to put a special substance on material such as wood, cloth, metal, etc. or put it through a special process, in order to protect it from damage or decay: The material has been treated with resin to make it waterproof.

treatnoun

uk   /triːt/ us   /triːt/
(Definition of treat from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"treat" in American English

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treatverb

us   /trit/
  • treat verb (DEAL WITH)

[T always + adv/prep] to behave toward someone or deal with something in a particular way: He treated his children badly. She always tried to treat her students as/like adults.
  • treat verb (GIVE MEDICAL CARE)

[T] to do something to improve the condition of an ill or injured person, or to try to cure a disease: The hospital treats hundreds of patients a day. The new drug may allow us to treat diabetes more effectively.
  • treat verb (PUT IN NEW CONDITION)

[T] to change the condition of a substance by adding something to it or putting it through a special process: The sewage is treated with chemicals before being dumped.
  • treat verb (PAY FOR)

[I/T] to buy or pay for something for someone: [T] I’m going to treat myself to a new pair of sunglasses.

treatnoun

us   /trit/
  • treat noun (SPECIAL EXPERIENCE)

[C] a special and enjoyable occasion or experience: It was a real treat seeing my old friends last weekend.
  • treat noun (PAYMENT)

[U] an occasion on which you pay for someone's food or entertainment: You paid for the taxi, so lunch is my treat (= I will pay).
(Definition of treat from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"treat" in Business English

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treatverb [T]

uk   /triːt/ us  
to behave towards or think of someone or something in a particular way: treat sb/sth as sth We must treat employees as allies in achieving change.treat sb/sth equally/fairly/unfairly It very hard to prove that the company had been treated unfairly.treat sb/sth like sth The company treated their initial public offering more like a marketing opportunity than a capital-raising exercise.
to deal with something in a particular way: Each Fund is treated as a single tax entity. The employment department said the unemployment figures should be treated with caution.
PRODUCTION to put a special substance on something or put it through a special process, in order to protect it, clean it, or make it safe: treat sth with sth We treat the material with resin to make it waterproof.
(Definition of treat from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“treat” in Business English

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Luckily, no one was hurt. (Adverbs for starting sentences)
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