try Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “try” in the English Dictionary

"try" in British English

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tryverb

uk   us   /traɪ/

try verb (ATTEMPT)

A2 [I or T] to ​attempt to do something: Keep trying and you'll ​find a ​jobeventually. If I don't get into the ​academy this ​year, I'll try again next ​year. I've tried really hard but I can't ​convince him to come. I'm trying my best/​hardest, but I just can't do it. [+ to infinitive] I tried toopen the ​window. [+ -ing verb] Maybe you should try getting up (= you should get up)earlier.
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try verb (TEST)

B1 [T] to ​test something to ​see if it is ​suitable or ​useful or if it ​works: I tried that ​recipe you gave me last ​night. We don't ​sellnewspapers - have you tried the ​coffeeshop on the ​corner? [+ -ing verb] Try using a different ​shampoo. I'd like to try parachuting. I ​forgot my door-keys - we'd ​better try the ​window (= ​test it to ​see if it is ​open).tried and tested/trusted (US tried and true) used by many ​people and ​proved to be ​effective: Most ​people would ​prefer to ​stick to tried and ​testedmethods of ​birthcontrol.

try verb (LAW)

C2 [T] to ​examine a ​personaccused of ​committing a ​crime in a ​lawcourt by ​asking them ​questions and ​consideringknownfacts, and then ​decide if they are ​guilty: Because of ​securityimplications the ​officers were tried in ​secret. They are being tried formurder.
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try verb (WORRY)

[T] to ​worry or ​annoy someone or ​upset a person's ​patience with many, often ​slight, difficulties: The ​demands of the ​job have tried him sorely. He's been trying my patience all ​morning with his ​constantquestions. Her ​endlessdemands would try the ​patience of a ​saint (= are very ​annoying).

trynoun

uk   us   /traɪ/

try noun (ATTEMPT)

B2 [C usually singular] an ​attempt to do something: They might still have ​ticketsleft - why don't you give it a try? This will be her third try atjumping the ​bar. You could ​ask him if he's ​willing - it's worth a try.
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try noun (SPORT)

[C] (in the ​game of rugby) the ​act of a ​player putting the ​ball on the ​ground behind the ​opposing team's ​goalline, which ​scorespoints for the player's ​team
(Definition of try from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"try" in American English

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tryverb

 us   /trɑɪ/

try verb (ATTEMPT)

[I/T] to make an ​effort to do something: [I] Try to ​open this ​jar for me. [I] You’ll have to try ​harder. [T] I’m trying my ​best. [I] Maybe you should try getting up ​earlier (= should ​wakeearlier).

try verb (TEST)

[T] to ​test something to ​see if it is ​suitable or ​useful, or if it will ​work: Have you tried that new ​recipeyet? I ​want to try ​scubadiving. Try the back ​door (= ​see if it is ​open).

try verb (EXAMINE IN COURT)

[T] law to ​examine a ​personaccused of ​committing a ​crime in a ​court of ​law to ​decide if the ​person is ​guilty: He was tried for ​fraud.

trynoun [C]

 us   /trɑɪ/

try noun [C] (ATTEMPT)

an ​effort to do something; an ​attempt: This will be her third try at an ​Olympicmedal. I ​decided to give ​skiing a try.
(Definition of try from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"try" in Business English

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tryverb [T]

uk   us   /traɪ/ LAW
to ​bring someone who is ​accused of a ​crime to a ​court of ​law to decide if they are guilty: be tried for sth The brothers were tried for ​financialcrimes involving ​fraudulent use of ​depositors' ​money. Their ​case is being tried next week.
(Definition of try from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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