twist Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “twist” in the English Dictionary

"twist" in British English

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twistverb

uk   us   /twɪst/

twist verb (TURN)

C2 [I or T] to ​turn something, ​especiallyrepeatedly, or to ​turn or ​wrap one thing around another: The ​path twists and ​turns for over a ​mile. She ​sat there ​nervously twisting the ​ring around on her ​finger. She twisted her ​head (round) so she could ​see what was ​happening. Twist the ​ropetightly round that ​post over there.C1 [T] If you twist a ​part of ​yourbody, such as ​your ankle, you ​injure it by ​suddenlyturning it: She ​slipped on the ​ice and twisted her ​knee.
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twist verb (CHANGE)

C2 [T] disapproving to ​changeinformation so that it gives the ​message you ​want it to give, ​especially in a way that is ​dishonest: This ​reportshows how she twisted the ​truth to ​claim successes where none, in ​fact, ​existed. You're twisting my words - that's not what I said at all.

twistnoun

uk   us   /twɪst/

twist noun (TURN)

[C] an ​act of twisting something: She gave the ​cap another twist to make ​sure it was ​tight. an Elvis-style twist of the ​hips [C] the ​shape of or a ​piece of something that has been twisted: a twist ofhair a twist oflemon [C] a ​tightbend: a ​path with many twists and ​turns
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twist noun (CHANGE)

[C] a ​change in the way in which something ​happens: The ​story took a ​surprise twist today with ​mediareports that the ​doctor had ​resigned. The ​incident was the latest twist in the ​continuingsaga of ​fraud and high ​scandal in ​banks and ​stockbrokerages. But for a ​cruel twist of ​fate/​fortune, he could now be ​running his own ​business. There's an ​unexpected twist in/to the ​plot towards the end of the ​film. [C] a ​complicatedsituation or ​plan of ​action: the twists and ​turns of ​fate It has ​proved very ​difficult to ​unravel the twists and ​turns and ​contradictions of the ​evidence.

twist noun (DANCE)

the twist [S] a ​dance in which ​peoplestay in one ​place and twist ​theirbodies from ​side to ​side to ​music
(Definition of twist from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"twist" in American English

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twistverb

 us   /twɪst/

twist verb (TURN)

[I/T] to ​turnrepeatedly, or to ​combinethinlengths of a ​material by ​turning or ​wrapping: [I] A ​river twists through the ​valley. [I] Vines twisted around the ​trunk of the ​oldtree. [I/T] If you twist a ​part of ​yourbody, you ​hurt it by ​turning it ​awkwardly: [T] He twisted his ​knee in the ​game on ​Saturday.

twist verb (CHANGE)

[T] to ​change the ​meaning of ​facts or a ​statement; distort : You’re twisting my words – that’s not what I ​meant at all. During the ​trial, ​lawyers twisted the ​truth to ​gain the jury’s ​sympathy.

twistnoun [C]

 us   /twɪst/

twist noun [C] (TURN)

the ​act of twisting or ​turningrepeatedly: The ​pathwoundits way down the ​hill in a ​series of twists. One more twist should ​tighten the ​cover. A twist can also be something that has been twisted: She ​added a twist of ​lemon to her ​cola.

twist noun [C] (CHANGE)

an ​unexpectedchange: The ​incident was the ​latest twist in the ​story of the robbery. Walnuts give a new twist to ​regularbananabread.
(Definition of twist from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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