unfavourable Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “unfavourable” in the English Dictionary

"unfavourable" in British English

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unfavourableadjective

UK US unfavorable uk   /ʌnˈfeɪ.vər.ə.bəl/ us   /ʌnˈfeɪ.vɚ.ə.bəl/
C2 not giving you an advantage or a good chance of success: Current conditions are very unfavourable for new businesses. We have to be prepared for an unfavourable outcome.
C2 negative and showing that you do not like something: He always talks about her in an unfavourable way. Of those surveyed, 62 percent said they had an unfavourable opinion of the president. The film has had unfavourable reviews.
Opposite
unfavourably
adverb uk   /ʌnˈfeɪ.vər.ə.bli/ us   /ʌnˈfeɪ.vɚ.ə.bli/
(Definition of unfavourable from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"unfavourable" in Business English

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unfavourableadjective

UK US unfavorable uk   /ʌnˈfeɪvərəbl/ us  
not good, and likely to cause problems or prevent success: Other countries may lure private equity executives offshore if the tax regime in Britain became unfavourable. unfavourable conditions/terms unfavourable prices/exchange ratesunfavourable to sb/sth Market conditions have been unfavorable to fund managers in recent times.
showing that someone does not like something or disapproves of it: The company has attracted unfavourable comparisons with its rivals. Organic food retailers are benefiting from an increase in the amount of unfavourable publicity surrounding fast food. an unfavourable report/review
unfavourably
adverb UK US unfavorably
Customer satisfaction with their products compared unfavourably with that achieved by their competitors.
(Definition of unfavourable from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“unfavourable” in British English

“unfavourable” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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