unwind Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “unwind” in the English Dictionary

"unwind" in American English

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unwindverb

us   /ʌnˈwɑɪnd/ past tense and past participle unwound /ʌnˈwɑʊnd/
  • unwind verb (UNFASTEN)

[T] to unfasten something that is wrapped around an object: to unwind string
  • unwind verb (RELAX)

[I] also wind down to relax after a period of work or anxiety: I’m just going to watch some TV and unwind.
(Definition of unwind from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"unwind" in Business English

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unwindverb

uk   /ʌnˈwaɪnd/ us   unwound, unwound
[T] FINANCE to sell shares, etc. that you bought expecting that their price would rise: Institutional investors caused prices to fall as they unwound positions that they took when they were betting on rising stock prices.
[T] FINANCE to buy the shares, etc. that you borrowed expecting that their price would go down and that you now need to deliver: Traders unwound short positions, expecting gasoline would be lower this time of year.
[I or T] to change or remove the effects of something: Financial markets believe that these imbalances can be unwound gradually, allowing the economy to land softly. People's ability to service debt is unwinding.
[I] also wind down to relax and allow your mind to be free from worry after a period of work: The facility was built as a place where casino workers could go and unwind after their shifts.
unwinding
noun [U]
The mark's weakness against the yen is a result of the unwinding of long positions.
(Definition of unwind from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of unwind?
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“unwind” in British English

“unwind” in American English

“unwind” in Business English

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