up Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “up” in the English Dictionary

"up" in British English

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upadverb

uk   us   /ʌp/

up adverb (HIGHER)

A2 towards a ​higherposition; towards a ​highervalue, ​number, or ​level: Put those ​books up on the ​topshelf. A ​gravelroadleads through the ​jungle and up into the Andes. Pushing the ​number of ​unitsales up every ​quarter can't be ​continuedindefinitely. The ​water was up to/had come up to the ​level of the ​windows. out of the ​ground: He ​spent the ​afternoondiggingcarrots up.up and down B2 from a ​higher to a ​lowerpositionrepeatedly: My little ​girlstarted jumping up and down with ​rage when she ​heard she couldn't go.
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up adverb (VERTICAL)

A1 in or into a ​verticalposition: Would you ​stand up for a ​minute? I ​want to ​see how ​tall you are.
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up adverb (TOP)

A2 in a high ​position; at the ​top: Our ​boardroom is up on the 23rd ​floor. You can ​tell which way up the ​crates have to be because they all say "TOP".
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up adverb (NEAR)

B1 very near: Carrying a ​gun, he ​walked up to the ​cashier and ​demandedmoney. A ​limousine drew up (= ​parked)outside the ​hotel.
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up adverb (INCREASE)

B2 to a ​greaterdegree; in ​order to ​increase: The ​fire heats the ​room up (= makes it ​warmer) within ​minutes. Grandma always turns the TV up really ​loud because she can't ​hear very well. Try not to get worked up (= ​increasinglyexcited or ​angry) - I'm ​sure we can ​resolve this.B2 If a ​level or ​amount is up, it has ​increased: The ​cost of ​carinsurance is up, but not very much. Last ​year the company's ​turnover was $240 ​billion, up three ​percent on (= ​compared with) the ​previousyear.
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up adverb (NOT IN BED)

B1 not in ​bed: It's ​time to get up now! I was up all ​night, ​finishing my ​essay.up and about/around to be ​able to get out of ​bed and ​move around again after a ​period of ​illness, because ​yourhealth has ​improved enough
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up adverb (EXIST)

into ​existence, ​view, or ​attention: Originally the ​charity was set up to ​helporphans in ​urbanareas. I'm ​sorry, but something ​unexpected has come up (= has ​happened) at the ​office, and I'll be ​home late. Coming up (= ​happening next) after the ​break, we have a man who ​claims he can ​communicate with ​fish. Would this be a good ​time to bring up the ​issue of ​salary?
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up adverb (EQUAL)

so as to be ​equal in ​quality, ​knowledge, or ​achievement: She couldn't go to ​school for a few ​weeks because of ​illness, but she'll be ​able to catch up (with her ​work) ​quickly. So much ​scientificresearch is being ​performed that it's ​virtuallyimpossible to keep up (with all the new ​developments).
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up adverb (TOGETHER)

in a ​state of being together with other ​similar things: You have ​half an ​hour to ​gather up anything you'll need for the ​journey. Add up the ​column of ​numbers in ​yourhead and then ​tell me what the ​total is.
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up adverb (TIGHTLY)

tightly or ​firmly in ​order to ​keep something ​safe or in ​position: Tie up the ​top of the ​bag so the ​rubbish doesn't ​fall out. You'd ​better wrap up (= ​wearwarmclothes) - it's ​coldoutside.UK Can you do my ​shoelaces up for me?
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up adverb (SMALLER)

broken or ​cut into ​smallerpieces; made ​smaller in ​area: He cut the ​letter up into a hundred ​pieces. She folded the ​newspaper up and put it in her ​bag. The ​car blew up (= ​exploded) when ​flamesreacheditsfueltank.
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up adverb (AGE)

to a ​greaterage: No one said that growing up would be ​easy or ​painless. Many ​singleparentsstruggle to bringtheirchildren up on a ​lowincome.
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up adverb (PROBLEM)

B1 [after verb] used when ​talking or ​asking about what is ​happening: Everyone was ​talking in ​whispers, and I could ​tell something was up (= something ​unusual was ​happening). What's up? (= What is ​happening or what is ​wrong?)

up adverb (FINISHED)

[after verb] When a ​period of ​time is up, it is ​finished: When the two ​hours were up nobody had ​answered all of the ​questions. Your time is up - it's someone else's ​turn on the ​trainingequipment now.

up adverb (IMPROVE)

into an ​improvedposition or ​state: By ​lap 26, Hamilton had moved up into second ​position. Stein had a ​badstart to the ​race, but by the ninth ​lap she was up with the ​leaders.
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up adverb (END)

B2 to an end, ​finish, or ​state of being ​complete: Finish up the ​oldloaf of ​bread before you ​start a new one. Crime won't ​help - you'll end up in ​prison. I'd like to round up the ​meeting by ​thanking all those who were ​able to ​attend at such ​shortnotice.

up adverb (DIRECTION)

towards the ​north: On ​Tuesday she'll be ​travelling up to Atlanta from New Orleans. UK towards a more ​importantplace, ​especially a ​city: How often do you go up to London? She comes up from her ​village about ​once a ​month on the ​train.

up adverb (INTENDED)

up for sth intended, ​suggested, or being ​considered for something: That ​house at the end of ​ourroad is up for ​sale again. Are you really up for ​promotion?

up adverb (EAGER)

up for (doing) sth informal willing and ​able to do or take ​part in an ​activity: After a ​longday at ​work I wasn't really up for a ​party. We're going ​swimming. Are you up for it? I'm up for organizing the ​meeting if nobody ​elsewants to do it.

up adverb (TRIAL)

[after verb] UK on ​trial in a ​court: If he doesn't ​pay the ​finesoon, he'll be up before the ​magistrate. Smith is up forarmedrobbery.

up adverb (ROAD)

[after verb] UK When a ​road is up, it is being ​repaired and so is ​unsuitable for use: The ​council has got the ​road up because of a ​brokensewer.

up adverb (HAIR)

If someone's ​longhair is up, it is ​arranged on the ​top or back of the ​head: You ​looknice with ​your hair up.

uppreposition

uk   us   /ʌp/

up preposition (HIGHER)

A2 to or in a ​higherlevel or ​position: We ​followed her up the ​stairs to a ​largemeetingroom.
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up preposition (TOP)

at the ​top of: You'll ​find a ​dustyattic up these ​stairs. If you ​want Fred, he's up that ​ladder.
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up preposition (ALONG)

A2 (​further) along: The ​carshot off up the ​road at high ​speed. They ​live just up the ​road.up and down B2 along the ​surface of something first in one ​direction and then in the ​oppositedirection, usually ​repeatedly: He was ​running up and down the ​street, ​shouting.
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up preposition (ORIGIN)

towards the ​startingpoint of something, ​especially a ​river or ​stream: Rowing up (the) ​river against the ​current was very hard ​work.
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up preposition (TO)

UK not standard to or at: Are you going up the ​clubtonight?

upadjective

uk   us   /ʌp/

up adjective (RISING)

moving up: an up ​escalator
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up adjective (IN OPERATION)

[after verb] When a ​system, ​computer, or ​similarmachine is up, it is ​operating, ​especially in ​itsusual way: Andy, do you ​know when the ​network will be up again?
Opposite
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up adjective (HAPPY)

informal feelinghappy: She's been really up since she ​started her new ​job.

upverb

uk   us   /ʌp/ informal

up verb (INCREASE)

[T] (-pp-) to ​increase something such as a ​price: We won't be ​able to make a ​profit on the ​deal without upping the ​saleprice. It ​looks like ​taxrates are going to be upped again.

up verb (GO AWAY)

up and ... used with another ​verb to ​emphasize that someone ​left a ​place or did something in a ​sudden and ​possiblyunexpected way: After ​dinner they just upped and left/went without saying ​goodbye.

up-prefix

uk   us   /ʌp-/
higher or ​improved: uphill uplift
(Definition of up from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"up" in American English

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upadverb [not gradable]

 us   /ʌp/

up adverb [not gradable] (HIGHER)

toward a ​higherposition, or toward a ​highervalue, ​number, or ​level: Pick up ​yourclothes and put them away. We need to ​pushsalesfigures up ​higher next ​quarter. The ​kids were ​jumping up and down on the ​bed.

up adverb [not gradable] (VERTICAL)

in or into a ​verticalposition: She ​jumped up to ​answer the ​phone. They put up (= ​built) the ​house in a ​matter of ​weeks.

up adverb [not gradable] (TOP)

in a high ​position; at the ​top: They moved to a ​house up in the ​hills.

up adverb [not gradable] (INCREASINGLY)

to a ​greaterdegree; in ​order to ​increase: The ​afternoonsun really ​heats up this ​room (= ​increases the ​heat in this ​room). Please ​speak up (= ​louder) – I can’t ​hear you.

up adverb [not gradable] (INTO EXISTENCE)

into ​existence, ​view, or ​consideration: I didn’t ​hesitate to ​bring up the ​salaryissue. Something came up at the ​office and I had to ​work late.

up adverb [not gradable] (EQUAL)

so as to be ​equal in ​quality or ​achievement: It’s ​impossible to ​keep up with all the new ​computer developments.

up adverb [not gradable] (NEAR)

very near: He ​walkedright up to me and ​introduced himself. The ​coppushed me up against the ​wall.

up adverb [not gradable] (TOGETHER)

in a ​state of being together with other ​similar things: Gather up ​your things – it’s ​time to go. She ​added up the ​numbers in her ​head.

up adverb [not gradable] (TIGHTLY)

tightly or ​firmly in ​order to ​keep something ​safe or in ​position: Tie the ​boat up at the ​dock. You’d ​betterbundle up (= ​wearwarmclothes) – it’s ​coldoutside.

up adverb [not gradable] (SMALLER)

made ​smaller in ​area or ​amount, esp. by ​cutting or ​dividing: Cut the ​cheese up into bite-size ​pieces. They ​broke the ​company up into three ​separateunits. He ​folded up the ​newspaper and put it in his ​briefcase.

up adverb [not gradable] (AGE)

to a ​greaterage: She ​wants to be a ​singer when she ​grows up.

up adverb [not gradable] (INTO IMPROVED POSITION)

into an ​improvedposition or ​state: By the third ​lap, Simms had moved up into second ​position.

up adverb [not gradable] (TOWARD NORTH)

toward the ​north: She comes up from Washington about ​once a ​month.
up
noun  us   /ʌp/
up
noun  us   /ʌp/

uppreposition

 us   /ʌp/

up preposition (ALONG)

(​farther) along: There’s a ​coffeeshop just up the ​street.

up preposition (TOP)

at the ​top of: His ​house is up the ​hill.

upadjective, adverb [not gradable]

 us   /ʌp/

up adjective, adverb [not gradable] (OUT OF BED)

out of ​bed: What ​time did you get up?

up adjective, adverb [not gradable] (ENDED)

finished, or to an end, ​finish, or ​state of being ​completed: Finish up ​yourbreakfast – it’s ​almosttime for ​school. My ​time is ​almost up on the ​parkingmeter.

upadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ʌp/

up adjective [not gradable] (IN OPERATION)

(of a ​system or ​machine, esp. a ​computer) ​operating, esp. in ​itsusual way: The new ​inventorysystem should be up and ​running by the end of the ​month.

up adjective [not gradable] (INTENDED)

intended, ​suggested, or being ​considered: The ​house at the end of ​ourstreet is up for ​sale. Ray’s up for ​promotion.

upverb [T]

 us   /ʌp/ (-pp-) infml

up verb [T] (HIGHER)

to ​increase the ​amount or ​level of something: We won’t be ​able to make a ​profitunless we up ​ourprices.
(Definition of up from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"up" in Business English

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upadverb

uk   us   /ʌp/
towards a ​highervalue, ​number, or ​level: Share ​pricesmoved up slowly yesterday. Pushing the ​number of ​unitsales up every ​quarter can't be continued indefinitely.
if a ​level or ​amount is up, it has ​increased: The ​cost of ​insurance is up quite a lot this ​year.up 5%, 20%, etc. on sth Last ​year the company's ​turnover was up 3% on the previous ​year.
in a ​state of being together with other similar things: Add up the ​column of ​figures.
to an end or ​state of being complete: Finish up this ​report before you ​leave tonight. I'd like to wind up the ​meeting by thanking you for coming.
up for sth intended, suggested, or being considered for something: Jack is up for ​promotion this ​year. They put the ​building up for ​sale. (also up for doing sth) willing and able to do or take ​part in an ​activity: After a ​long day of ​meetings, I wasn't really up for taking the ​clients out for dinner. He ​asked if anyone wanted to ​try, and I said I was up for it.
up to sth as high as a particular ​level or ​number: The Competition ​Commission clamped down on ​lenders who ​charge borrowers in deprived ​areasinterestrates of up to 900%. Owners who ​hireillegalworkers face up to five ​years in prison. Women who have been with a ​firm for some ​time are told that their ​files have been ​reviewed and suddenly their ​work is not up to ​standard. (also up until sth) until a particular ​point in ​time: Up to now, we've had all the ​resources we needed. I was ​treated as a ​trustedemployee up until about six months ago. able to do something: I had four hundred ​pages of ​reports to read, and I just didn't ​feel up to it.up to the job/task Do you ​think he's up to the ​job?

upadjective [after verb]

uk   us   /ʌp/ IT
if a ​computer, ​system, etc. is up, it is ​operatingnormally: The ​system is up again, so we have to get back to ​work. Do you know when the ​network will be up again?
up and running if a ​computer, ​machine, or ​system is up and ​running, it is ​operatingnormally: The air-conditioning is up and ​running again after two days of problems.

upnoun

uk   us   /ʌp/
on the up (and up) UK improving or ​increasing: It's only a ​smallbusiness but it's definitely on the up. Houseprices are still on the up.
on the up and up US used to describe something that is done ​legally or honestly: Do you ​feel everything with the governor's ​landdeal was done on the up and up? Drug ​makers face at least one ​majorchallenge: convincing ​consumers that ​ads are on the up and up.
ups and downs the ​normal good ​times and ​badtimes that ​happen in any ​situation or ​period: Luard was looking to ​buy a new ​business to ​balance his other ​companies' dependence on the ups and downs of the ​oilsector. The ​magazineindustry has had its ups and downs.

upverb [T]

uk   us   /ʌp/ (-pp-) informal
to ​increase something such as a ​price: We won't be able to make a ​profit on the ​deal without upping the ​saleprice. It looks like ​taxrates are going to be upped again.
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(Definition of up from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“up” in Business English

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