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Meaning of “upgrade” in the English Dictionary

"upgrade" in British English

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upgradeverb [T]

uk   /ʌpˈɡreɪd/ us   /ʌpˈɡreɪd/
B2 to improve the quality or usefulness of something, such as a machine or a computer program, or give a person a more important job or state that their job is more important than it was in the past: It's very simple to upgrade the indexing software. There were no seats left in economy so we were upgraded to business class.
Opposite

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

upgradenoun [C]

uk   /ˈʌp.ɡreɪd/ us   /ˈʌp.ɡreɪd/
(Definition of upgrade from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"upgrade" in American English

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upgradeverb [T]

us   /ˌʌpˈɡreɪd/
to improve the quality or usefulness of something, or to raise something or someone to a higher position or rank: If you want to raise rents, you have to upgrade the housing first. They’re spending more than $4 million next year to upgrade computer systems. In 1992 the college was upgraded to a university. We were upgraded from tourist to business class on our flight to London.
(Definition of upgrade from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"upgrade" in Business English

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upgradeverb [T]

uk   /ʌpˈɡreɪd/ us  
to improve something so that it works better or is more effective: It's quite simple to upgrade the indexing software. All the entrances to the building have been upgraded with ramps and handrails.
IT to get new computers or other equipment that is better than you had before: So much of our business is now online we had to upgrade our entire system. The network is being upgraded.
HR to give a person a more important job or to state that their job is more important than it was before: upgrade sb to sth Congratulations, I hear you've been upgraded to divisional manager.
FINANCE to state that something such as a company is likely to produce more profit or growth, to be better able to pay back debt, etc. than was previously thought: upgrade a forecast/outlook/expectation Analysts had hoped to upgrade their earnings forecasts for the group.upgrade a rating/status The retailer's stock hit a 52-week high after Morgan Stanley upgraded its rating on the company.
TRANSPORT to get better travel arrangements than you originally paid for: upgrade sth (from sth) to sth Our plane tickets were upgraded to business class. We will upgrade your rental car from mid-size to full-size.

upgradenoun [C]

uk   /ˈʌpɡreɪd/ us  
an improvement in something: All our office furniture needs a major upgrade.
Compare
IT a piece of software or equipment that improves how well a computer or machine works: The basic software is free but you pay for any upgrades.an upgrade to sth The upgrade to version 5.0 costs $395.
better travel arrangements than you originally paid for: an upgrade to sth We got a free upgrade to first class!
(Definition of upgrade from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“upgrade” in British English

Watching the detectorists
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by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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